Friday 31 May 2013 by Nick Crofts. 3 comments.
First World War Centenary, ANZAC Connections

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections selected for this project will reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

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Monday 27 May 2013 by Emma Campbell. 2 comments.
News

The horror of hellships, death marches, and starvation, and the drama of great escapes, has shaped the public perception of Australian prisoners of war.  But there is a more complex story, and the thousands held in captivity during the two world wars and the Korean war cannot define their internment only by these experiences. 

Leading historians, veterans, and family members will present new research on what it was like to be an Australian prisoner of war at a conference to be held in Canberra next week.

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Friday 17 May 2013 by Meagan Nihill. 7 comments.
ANZAC Connections Volunteers

This week is National Volunteer Week. Much invaluable work is undertaken by volunteers at the Memorial, and last Friday marked the beginning of a new volunteer project within the Research Centre.

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Friday 17 May 2013 by Nick Crofts. No comments.
First World War Centenary, ANZAC Connections

ANZAC Connections: Centenary digitisation project

 

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections selected for this project will reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

Read on

Monday 13 May 2013 by Emma Campbell. 1 comments.
News

Australia’s 12-year commitment to the war in Afghanistan has been a mix of tragedy and triumph: soldiers have been killed, Victoria Crosses won, and security and services improved in some parts of the war-ravaged nation. By the end of 2014, international forces will have gone – but what legacy will they have left?

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Friday 10 May 2013 by Roxanne Truesdale. 4 comments.
First World War Centenary The ANZAC Book, Gallipoli

Hi, my name is Roxi Truesdale and for six weeks I have worked as a curatorial intern at the Australian War Memorial. During this time I have been involved with the Exhibitions team, where I have been researching all of the material that was written and drawn by soldiers for publication in The ANZAC Book.

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Thursday 9 May 2013 by Kerry Neale. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection Highlights

Facial wounds were extremely common during the First World War, particularly when an unthinking soldier popped his head over the trench parapet. But even soldiers serving within the enclosed “safety” of a tank were not immune from such wounds: small pieces of steel could splinter off the inner surface of the tank when shells struck the outside, causing serious wounds to those inside. 

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Wednesday 8 May 2013 by Kerry Neale. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection Highlights

It was not just human soldiers on the Western Front during the First World War who needed protection from the new dangers of chemical warfare. Animals serving beside them were also vulnerable. Collected off the battlefield by a member of the 41st Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, this gas mask was made for a German messenger dog.

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Saturday 27 April 2013 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2012

Today was a sad day for us all. Leaving the Gallipoli peninsula and leaving behind all those boys from all nations is difficult. We as a group have paid our respects and honoured the men from all sides. It is hard in such a short time, to give a full perspective of the campaign but I am sure that the students and teachers alike are leaving with a new sense of what Gallipoli means and what it was all about.

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