Friday 7 February 2014 by Kathleen Cusack. 2 comments.
Education at the Memorial, Memorial box banter, News

The Australian War Memorial is fortunate to have nearly eighty Memorial Boxes situated across Australia. Twenty are stored on-site here in Canberra whilst the remainder are administered by the State Library of Queensland, Social Education Victoria, City of Fremantle, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Darwin Military Museum, State Library of South Australia, Albury City Library Museum, Western-Australian Museum and Museum of Tropical Queensland throughout the year.

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Thursday 6 February 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments.
Education at the Memorial, News

Here in the Education section we love to know what you're working on in the classroom, or how you might have used some of our resources. Send in your pictures, poems, photos, or anything else you'd like to share to education@awm.gov.au. We'll feature a selection on our website every month.

Look forward to hearing from you!

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Tuesday 4 February 2014 by John Holloway. 11 comments.
Education at the Memorial, News

"What is it?"

Calling all teachers, students, and history buffs: test your observation and deduction with number five in our Collection Detection series. Tell us what you think this object is in the comments section below, and next week we will post the answer along with some questions for classroom research and discussion.

Hint: This object was found at Lone Pine in January 1919 by Lieutenant William Hopkins James.

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Tuesday 4 February 2014 by Craig Tibbitts. 6 comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection, Collection Highlights, ANZAC Voices, Personal Stories

This article was originally published in Inside History Magazine, Issue 20, Jan - Feb 2014. Find out more and subscribe to Inside History here.

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Monday 3 February 2014 by Gabrielle Considine. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection, Collection Highlights Sound Collection Online

The Australian War Memorial has remarkable hidden stories in its sound collection. This compilation of interview extracts reveals the lucky escapes of five men that served during the First World War. These men suffered wounds, sickness and witnessed the horrific casualties of war. They describe themselves to be the lucky ones.

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Tuesday 28 January 2014 by John Holloway. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, News

Thanks to everyone who submitted answers to last week's Collection Detection challenge either here on the blog or on our Facebook page. Well done to those who knew the answer!

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Monday 20 January 2014 by John Holloway. 4 comments.
Education at the Memorial, News

What is it?

Think you know? Tell us in the comments below. You'll find the answer posted next week!

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Monday 20 January 2014 by Nick Crofts. 6 comments.
First World War Centenary, ANZAC Connections

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war.  The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

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Friday 10 January 2014 by Dianne Rutherford. 2 comments.
Collection, ANZAC Voices Pheasant Wood, Fromelles, ANZAC voices

The ANZAC voices exhibition features a number of rare documents displayed for the first time, such as some of Frederick Tubb’s diaries and John Simpson Kirkpatrick’s letters. It is also the first time the Memorial has displayed relics recovered from the Pheasant Wood mass grave at Fromelles.

They are a combination of personal and military issued items. Five of the six items are associated with unidentified remains, the sixth item, a scrap of gas goggles, is associated with Ray Pflaum who died of wounds as a prisoner of war on 19 July 1916 and who is featured in the exhibition. The goggles are very fragile and it is amazing that any part of them survived. You can still see one of the yellowed celluloid eye pieces and the holes where stitching has come undone.

REL44989 the remains of Ray Pflaum's gas goggles

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