Thursday 12 December 2013 by Dianne Rutherford. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection, ANZAC Voices Gallipoli, Improvisation

Some of the objects on display in the new ANZAC voices exhibition illustrate the ingenuity of the ANZACs when faced with insufficient supplies and equipment at Gallipoli. When the ANZACs landed there on 25 April 1915, they expected a quick advance to Constantinople [Istanbul] so did not carry the equipment or supplies they needed for trench warfare. Although supplies were brought in throughout the campaign by boat, these could be delayed or destroyed through bad weather or Turkish shelling, so the soldiers at Gallipoli had to be industrious and inventive. They made weapons, equipment, board games and stationary from the items they found around them.

G00267 Two soldiers sit beside a pile of empty tins cutting up barbed wire for jam tin bombs. G00267

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Thursday 5 December 2013 by Liz Holcombe. 4 comments.
ANZAC Connections Search

In December 2013 we will be adding a new search facility to our website.

The new search will allow you to search all the information on our website from one search box; for example, you will be able to type a name or a topic into the search box and see all the information we have which is related to that name or topic.

Once the new search is live, it will be available from the search box on the top right hand corner of every page and also through the “Collection” tab in the main menu on the site.

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This sound reel features Australian soldiers from the First World War recalling memories of recruitment and enlistment.

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Wednesday 4 December 2013 by Alana Treasure. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Conservation Dioramas, Getting ready to move

Part 2 - Reinforcement and Movement

As mentioned previously, the dioramas consist of a number of sections of base framework, some of which are bolted together, some of which are not. Well-hidden behind the display cases, facades and the diorama surface, few still sat on their original leg castors, while many had been trimmed and placed on fascinating, decades-old systems of levelling the individual sections.

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Wednesday 4 December 2013 by Alana Treasure. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Conservation Dioramas, Getting ready to move

Part 1 - Demolition When the Western Front dioramas were previously brought into their current positions when the gallery opened in the 1970s, they were dismantled in (now) Aircraft Hall, and moved in as separate sections and re-joined with plaster and fill material in the space. At that time, the dioramas were not considered National Collection items, a status they gained in the 1990s. As National Collection items, and even if they weren’t, our approach today is to avoid sectioning the dioramas and to move them, where possible, as a single unit.

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Monday 2 December 2013 by Nick Crofts. No comments.
First World War Centenary, ANZAC Connections

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war.  The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

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Monday 2 December 2013 by Liz Holcombe. 1 comments.

Towards the middle of December 2013 you will notice some changes on our website.  The changes are intended to make it easier for you to find information on our site.

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Friday 29 November 2013 by Craig Tibbitts. 3 comments.
First World War Centenary, Exhibitions, ANZAC Voices, Personal Stories

ANZAC Voices is the Memorial’s new special exhibition on the First World War, which opened to the public today. It features treasures from the Memorial’s written archives; the voices of the ANZACs presented through their letters and diaries, and supported by a variety of other official documents, photographs, artworks and historical artefacts.

Theme image

The curators chose the above photo to be the exhibition’s theme image for obvious reasons, given it’s built around the written record.  We also thought it was a good strong image that could carry off the important exhibition ‘branding’ role.  Who knows what he’s writing – we might imagine it’s a letter home to the family, but it could just as easily be some routine administrative paperwork.

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Wednesday 27 November 2013 by Daniel McGlinchey. No comments.
Personal Stories

“We would have rather served under the Australian flag than a fake Japanese one!” said a sprightly Second World War veteran. He had just asked me if an Australian made replica Japanese flag was still on display. It was going to be used on Motor Launch (ML) 814 during Operation Mosquito in 1943 to confuse the enemy if they were spotted. It was around 2009 and I was honoured to find that I was talking to Marsden Carr Hordern a veteran who had sailed on ML 814 during Operation Mosquito.

 

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Wednesday 27 November 2013 by Cherie Prosser. No comments.
Collection, Collection Highlights

Cartoonist and caricaturist, John Frith (1906-2000) created a daily drawing for the Herald newspaper in Melbourne. 

The 1960s was a turbulent decade politically and Frith created this series of drawings to articulate some of the key international political struggles for an Australian audience. The main actors on Frith’s stage were Australian Prime Ministers, as well as the world leaders who dominated the politics of the period. Frith began his career as a cartoonist in 1929 at the time of the onset of the Great Depression in Australia.

 

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