Thursday 8 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 11 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Western Front

The major battles of 1916 took place on the Somme. The offensive began on the 1st July 1916 and would become one of the most costly episodes of the war. Between July and mid November the losses reached a total of 1,300,000 men.

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Tuesday 6 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 1 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Western Front

The battle field tour, following a strategic withdrawal from Gallipoli, is now touring the battlefields of France. Reinforced with fresh recruits from Australia we travelled to Normandy and viewed the Bayeux Tapestry and then on to the site of the Second World War D Day landings.

Scarred terrain at Pointe Du Hoc and cliffs

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Monday 5 May 2008 by Andrew Gray. 3 comments.
Battlefield Tours Simpson Prize Winners

This is the final post for our 2008 Simpson Prize blog, with some reflections on the trip, as we all try and settle back into 'normal' life. The trip is without a doubt a once-in-a-lifetime expereince and we were lucky to share it with such a special group of people. Like all travel, it's often the connections that you make with people that are the highlights, more than where you go. However, going to Turkey and being at Gallipoli for Anzac Day certainly combines the place and the people in a great way.

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Thursday 1 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 2 comments.
Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

Pearl McGill's great uncle died of wounds on Anzac Day and is buried at Plugge's Plateau. Private George Bell of the 11th Battalion was killed in action on 25th April, 1915. He was 28 years old and the son of Jane McFadyen Bell. Pearl is the first person from the family to come back and visit his grave. We were moved when Pearl shared his story with us and read some prayers.

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Thursday 1 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

The tour visited Shrapnel Valley Cemetery in the late afternoon and were touched by the sad expression of loss on the grave of Private John Edward Barclay of the 8th Battalion. He was killed in action on the 21 June 1915 and was the husband of Louisa Mary Barclay. He is buried at Shrapnel Valley Cemetery Anzac.

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Thursday 1 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

The Walk from Chunuk Bair down Rhododendron Ridge to the northern outposts gave the tour an appreciation of the difficulty of the terrain around this area of the peninsula.

Gallipoli terrain from Rhododendron Ridge

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Monday 28 April 2008 by Andrew Gray. 2 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Simpson Prize Winners

Our last morning in Turkey has finally arrived as we work out how to stuff everything into already bulging bags and spend our remaining lira. The final day yesterday included a visit to the beautiful Chora Church which features mosaics depicting the life of the Virgin Mary. Being a Sunday it was a little easier to get around Istanbul without the usual crazy traffic.

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Sunday 27 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 5 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

A couple of days after the landing on the 25th April 1915 the weather turned bitterly cold for the ANZACs dug in at Gallipoli. Having been blessed with the weather so far, the battlefield tour received a good dose of what it would have been like for the diggers in 1915.

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Sunday 27 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

ANZAC Cove is the name given to this stretch of the west coast of the Turkish Peninsula where the Australians and New Zealanders made their landing on the 25 April 1915. The landing marked the start of an eight month campaign on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The ANZACs under General Birdwood were to make the northern landing. Once ashore they were to press inland.The Battlefield tour took a boat trip yesterday to the coast where the ANZACs made their famous landing on the morning of Sunday 25 April.

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Sunday 27 April 2008 by Andrew Gray. 4 comments.
Battlefield Tours Simpson Prize Winners

Wednesday - To Helles and back

Following our exploration of the ANZAC part of the Gallipoli campaign, we moved to Cape Helles to look at the battles that took place at the south of peninsula. A visit to the British Memorial reminded us of the significant naval presence and the huge number of British troops involved in the battles for Krithia. At the top of the cliff we looked down onto V Beach where the River Clyde beached and the British troops were cut down as they tried to establish a beachhead.

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