The Sound Collection at the Australian War Memorial consists of over 9,000 oral history interviews with individuals who served during war and peacekeeping efforts. To showcase highlights from this collection the Australian War Memorial will create Sound show reels.

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The glass-plate negatives from Vignacourt are significant because they offer insights into the reality of life on the Western Front. There are photos that show the laughter and the mateship among these soldiers, and the general feeling of life away from the line. Like any true portrait, many offer an insight into the character and mood of the subject. None of the soldiers in this post have been identified, but photographs created so close to the battlefields of the Somme means portrait subjects who have witnessed true horrors.

 

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ART19776 Charles Delacy, The storming of the Mole at Zeebrugger, Belgium, 1916, ART19776

The raid on Zeebrugge to cripple the inland port of Bruges in occupied Belgium in April 1918 lasted a little more than an hour. It cost the lives of over 200 British sailors and marines with hundreds more wounded. Artificer Engineer William Henry Vaughan Edgar, late of HMAS Australia, joined the raid on a Mersey ferry steamer and in the process became the Royal Australian Navy’s only Distinguished Service Cross winner of the First World War.

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Tuesday 20 August 2013 by Daniel Eisenberg. No comments.
Collection, Collection Highlights Photographs

This slideshow was screened as part of the "Vietnam through a lens" film screening at the Australian War Memorial on Vietnam Veterans Day, 2013. We hope you enjoy it as much as those that were able to attend on the day did.

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Steel lifeboat from HMT Ascot used in the landings on Gallipoli.
AWM RELAWM05086.001

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Friday 28 June 2013 by Daniel Eisenberg. 2 comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection, Collection Highlights, News Film

The Australian War Memorial is currently in the process of releasing a vast selection of its film collection online as downloadable content through our website. This material, comprising of over 3000 titles, joins items from the Memorial’s sound collection which have been available online for the last few months. Already over 1200 film items have been released to our website. Each title that is available online has a link embedded on its object record page which lets you download a copy of the film to your personal computer.

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A fateful flight : Australian Navigator takes control of his aircraft flying at low level after pilot killed. He has never flown an aircraft before, let alone one with multiple engines and one that is damaged, barely above the water and in the dark. He successfully navigates and flies the aircraft with remaining four crew back to base. Without stalling the aircraft he climbs over the base and his crew mates safely parachute jump. He then safely crash lands the aicraft just after midnight, bringing the body of his pilot back to base and saving his own live. Awarded the second highest gallantry medal to the Victoria Cross for air or naval operations, the Conspicious Gallantry Medal for his actions. Continued to serve in the Air Force, flying in a diverse range of aircraft including gliders and bombers in the United Kingdom for the remainder of the war. Meets and marries his wife in the United Kingdom in 1944, he survives the war and returns to Australia to start a family and resume his career as an architect.

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Thursday 9 May 2013 by Kerry Neale. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection Highlights

Facial wounds were extremely common during the First World War, particularly when an unthinking soldier popped his head over the trench parapet. But even soldiers serving within the enclosed “safety” of a tank were not immune from such wounds: small pieces of steel could splinter off the inner surface of the tank when shells struck the outside, causing serious wounds to those inside. 

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Wednesday 8 May 2013 by Kerry Neale. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection Highlights

It was not just human soldiers on the Western Front during the First World War who needed protection from the new dangers of chemical warfare. Animals serving beside them were also vulnerable. Collected off the battlefield by a member of the 41st Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, this gas mask was made for a German messenger dog.

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