Wednesday 3 November 2010 by Jamie Croker. No comments.
Collection, Conservation

One of the first steps in the conversion to re-fit the Boulton Paul upper turret was to remove any excess material from the fuselage.  This meant cutting a hole in the upper rear fuselage, and removing the skin and additional structure which had been replaced post war.

Out line where skin needed to be cut

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Monday 1 November 2010 by John Kemister. 1 comments.
Conservation

Monday 18 October 2010 by Jamie Croker. No comments.
Collection, Conservation

The damaged rear fuselage section from Hudson A16-128, which crashed during training at Tocumwal, New South Wales,  was aquired by the AWM several years ago.  This fuselage section contains a large proportion of the structure missing from A16-105 to support the upper gun turret in the fuselage. 

A16-128 Rear Fuselage

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Wednesday 6 October 2010 by Jamie Croker. 1 comments.
Collection, Conservation

One of the first steps in the conversion of the Hudson from its post war airline and geo-survey role to its original military configuration, was the removal of all the post war modifications. 

The first two photos below are taken inside the cabin of the Royal New Zealand Air Force's Hudson on Display in the RNZAF Museum in Christchurch, and they give an idea of what the inside of the cabin should look like .

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Tuesday 28 September 2010 by Jamie Croker. No comments.
Collection, Conservation

The conservation of the Lockheed Hudson Bomber A16-105 has begun in the War Memorial's Treloar workshops, the main aim of the work being the refitting of the upper and lower gun positions, as well as internal fitout of equipment and furnishings and application of a paint scheme more representative of that worn by the aircraft during Second World War service. 

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Wednesday 1 September 2010 by Liz Holcombe. 1 comments.
Collection, Conservation

One of the questions asked today on Ask a Curator day on Twitter was:

Q: Interested to know if the curators have a favourite piece, or does it change with each new exhibition?

Our curators came up with a lot of different answers:

Jessie: 

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Emma Jones previously mentioned in 60 year old sweat on a wedding dress – a conservation challenge the preparation of Miss Platt-Hepworth’s wedding dress for the exhibition Of Love and War. The decision was made by the curator Rebecca Britt to keep the staining as evidence of use.

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Isn’t it funny how things come about? While working on the textiles component for the exhibition Of Love and War a painted kitbag came to me for treatment. The lovely pin-up painted on the bag looked an awful lot like Dorothy Lamour, a beautiful actress known as the “Sarong Girl” in the 1940’s.  As the exhibition will be travelling I had to chuckle that Dorothy Lamour made a string of Bing Crosby/ Bob Hope “On the Road” films. The kitbag belonged to Signaller John Conrad Lynam, a timber cutter from Brisbane.

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Thursday 19 November 2009 by Sarah Clayton. 3 comments.
Conservation, Of love and war Conservation, Of Love and War, wedding dress, Wedding Dresses, preservation, Textile

Once we determined that the remaining three wedding dresses, requested for the exhibtion Of Love and War, were able to be safely put on display, the textile conservators worked in collaboration with curators and exhibition staff to determine the dimensions of showcase and, the types and styles of mannequins.

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Thursday 12 November 2009 by Emma Jones. 7 comments.
Conservation, Of love and war Exhibition, Conservation, Love and war, Of Love and War

Back in September, I was doing some work out at our Treloar Annex, which is where our conservators work.  I was videoing the construction process of the mannequins being made for the 3 wedding dresses  that are to be included in the “Of love and war” exhibition. During a break in filming I got talking to Jessie Firth, who was working on one of the wedding dresses .  She was applying fake perspiration to material to see what effect it would have.

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