Saturday 10 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Western Front

When walking the battlefields of the Somme it is evident that most of the visible signs of destruction caused by the First World War have disappeared. The enormous Lochnagar Crater is one of the few surviving scars left on the terrain in this region. A monument to the devastation of war, this crater was caused by a 60,000 lbs mine and is 100 metres in diameter and 30 metres deep. It is hard to capture its sheer size in a photograph.

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Thursday 8 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 11 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Western Front

The major battles of 1916 took place on the Somme. The offensive began on the 1st July 1916 and would become one of the most costly episodes of the war. Between July and mid November the losses reached a total of 1,300,000 men.

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Wednesday 7 May 2008 by Kathryn Hicks. 5 comments.
News, Personal Stories Private Records

PR01950

When searching through the Memorial's Private Records collection this item was found.

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Tuesday 6 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 1 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Western Front

The battle field tour, following a strategic withdrawal from Gallipoli, is now touring the battlefields of France. Reinforced with fresh recruits from Australia we travelled to Normandy and viewed the Bayeux Tapestry and then on to the site of the Second World War D Day landings.

Scarred terrain at Pointe Du Hoc and cliffs

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Tuesday 6 May 2008 by Pen Roberts. 2 comments.
News

Around Australia this week people will be rushing to the post office to send off their last minute Mothers Day cards. Back in the Second World War, with no nearby stationers' shops, what did servicemen and women in the field do? Obviously they could have written a letter, but it just wasn't the same as sending a dedicated card.

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Thursday 1 May 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

The tour visited Shrapnel Valley Cemetery in the late afternoon and were touched by the sad expression of loss on the grave of Private John Edward Barclay of the 8th Battalion. He was killed in action on the 21 June 1915 and was the husband of Louisa Mary Barclay. He is buried at Shrapnel Valley Cemetery Anzac.

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Monday 28 April 2008 by Andrew Gray. 2 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Simpson Prize Winners

Our last morning in Turkey has finally arrived as we work out how to stuff everything into already bulging bags and spend our remaining lira. The final day yesterday included a visit to the beautiful Chora Church which features mosaics depicting the life of the Virgin Mary. Being a Sunday it was a little easier to get around Istanbul without the usual crazy traffic.

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Sunday 27 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 5 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

A couple of days after the landing on the 25th April 1915 the weather turned bitterly cold for the ANZACs dug in at Gallipoli. Having been blessed with the weather so far, the battlefield tour received a good dose of what it would have been like for the diggers in 1915.

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Sunday 27 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

ANZAC Cove is the name given to this stretch of the west coast of the Turkish Peninsula where the Australians and New Zealanders made their landing on the 25 April 1915. The landing marked the start of an eight month campaign on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The ANZACs under General Birdwood were to make the northern landing. Once ashore they were to press inland.The Battlefield tour took a boat trip yesterday to the coast where the ANZACs made their famous landing on the morning of Sunday 25 April.

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Thursday 24 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 1 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

Homer described the location of the city of Troy as situated at the entrance of the Dardanelles. The Gallipoli campaign was fought a few kilometres from the site of the ancient city. The historical connections between the ancient and modern battlefields were not lost on the Australians fighting in this region. Many ANZACs found pieces of ancient pottery when tunnelling into the hills.The battlefield tour took the opportunity to walk through the ruins of this ancient city and to take some group photographs. We are divided into two groups Green (top) and Gold (bottom).

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