Wednesday 3 September 2008 by Annette Gaykema. 5 comments.
Collection First World War, Ephemera, How To...

Embroidered silk postcards were first made in 1900 with popularity peaking during the First World War. Cards were generally embroidered on strips of silk mesh by French women. They were then cut and mounted on postcards.

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Thursday 21 August 2008 by Ann Penhallow. No comments.
Personal Stories, Family history First World War, Official records

What does a twenty-three year old wag of a soldier say in his defence, when facing yet another court martial for going AWOL during the First World War? 

If you're Private Albert Stipek, the words come easily: "I met some friends and went away with them. I had no idea the Battalion was going to the Line. I thought it was going out for a spell".  Nevertheless, he had absented himself from the 51st Battalion for nearly two months.

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Tuesday 19 August 2008 by Ann Penhallow. 4 comments.
Collection First World War, Animals in war, Official records

This week the Research Centre received a call from a fan of Sandy, Major General Sir William Throsby Bridges' favourite charger.  November this year sees the 90th anniversary of Sandy's return to Australia, after a tour of duty which included the coast of Gallipoli, Egypt and France.  Sandy's fan wished to confirm the information the Research Centre has about this much-loved animal in preparation for a ceremony to mark the anniversary.

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Friday 8 August 2008 by Kerrie Leech. 5 comments.
Personal Stories, Collection First World War, Private Records

Studio portrait of Tom Richards in 1917 (from Gold, mud 'n' guts by Greg Growden).

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Tuesday 1 April 2008 by Dianne Rutherford. No comments.
Collection First World War, Technology

On display in the Memorial's First World War Gallery is this damaged trench mortar barrel. The explosion that damaged this Stokes 3" trench mortar barrel in 1918 also sadly killed two young men from the 6th Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery.

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Monday 17 March 2008 by Amanda Rebbeck. 3 comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, Personal Stories, Collection First World War, Training, Heraldry, Private Records

Crashes and fires were everyday hazards for the First World War flier. Second Lieutenant Frederick Gulley suffered both when trying to land his aircraft in England on 17 October 1918. Gulley was on a cross country flight and struck a post whilst attempting to land in a field close to Tidworth Barracks, Wiltshire. In the resulting fire Gulley’s clothes, harness, face and hands were burnt. He was taken to Tidworth Hospital with superficial burns to his face, neck and both hands, including all fingers. 

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Wednesday 5 March 2008 by Craig Berelle. No comments.
Personal Stories, Collection First World War

It was 10 March 1919, and readers of the London Daily Mail were asked to help solve a wartime puzzle.

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Tuesday 19 February 2008 by Janette Condon. No comments.
Personal Stories, Collection First World War

Mention is sometimes made of personal events in the war diaries of the first Australian Imperial Force (AIF), currently being digitised by the Research Centre.

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