25 April 1915
The British landings

The main task for the invasion of the Gallipoli peninsula had been given to the regular soldiers of the British 29th Division. They were ordered to capture the end of the peninsula at Cape Helles and to advance from there.

The British troops came ashore at five beaches. There was stiff fighting – and terrible casualties – at the two main landing points. At “W Beach” the 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers won six Victoria Crosses; their beach became known as “Lancashire Landing”. At the vital “V Beach” troops came ashore in boats and a converted collier, the River Clyde, which was run aground to deliver its men. The British stormed down gangplanks into a death trap, with many killed even before they got onto the beach.

By the end of the day the British were ashore at Cape Helles, but their situation was as chaotic and desperate as that of the Australians and New Zealanders at ANZAC. Only a minor diversionary attack by the French at Kum Kale had succeeded. As at ANZAC, the British held on during the rest of the campaign but made no major gains. Their troops were the last to withdraw from Gallipoli, finally leaving Lancashire Landing on 9 January 1916.

By the end of the day the British were ashore at Cape Helles, but their situation was as chaotic as that at ANZAC. Only a minor diversionary attack by the French at Kum Kale had succeeded. Like at ANZAC, the British held on during the rest of the campaign but made no major gains. The British troops were the last to withdraw from Gallipoli, finally leaving from Lancashire Landing on 9 January 1916.

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British troops ashore on "V Beach" at Cape Helles H10284