Saturday 3 April 2010 by Janice Farrer. No comments
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds. 

The band of the 12th Battalion plays for an audience of soldiers including members of the 9th Battery, 3rd Field Artillery Brigade (3FAB), before the Battery's departure for Lemnos and then Gallipoli. The band of the 12th Battalion plays for an audience of soldiers including members of the 9th Battery, 3rd Field Artillery Brigade (3FAB), before the Battery's departure for Lemnos and then Gallipoli. P00046.018

‘The whole camp was astir early and set about striking camp, a proceeding which everybody energetically carried out, glad of the prospect of something less monotonous than solid training and camp routine to engage our attention. At 7am the advance and baggage parties left camp to entrain and at 7pm our unit moved out of camp leaving our mess hut standing to mark the site of out camp. As we tool a last backward glance at out camp site one could not help but notice the contrast in the scene at sunrise and at the time of our departure, sunset. The great camp had disappeared, all the remained being the mess huts standing deserted and hundreds of fires dotted over the whole area consuming rubbish and unnecessary articles etc. That had collected in camp. All day a huge cloud of locusts have been overhead, one cannot realize what a locust plague is until seeing one, looking at the sun is like looking at the moon. The density of the moving swarm of insects acts in the same manner as a smoked glass, the whole sky seemed to be a moving mass of them. The march into Cairo along the Mena road and over the Kasr el Nil bridge was by no means inclined to be monotonous, as every one shows a restrained feeling of pleasure of the last being on the move to take an active part in the great event for which we left home. Throughout the day no sign of unnecessary bustle could be observed, but a steady and consistent orderliness could be observed everywhere. At 11pm we arrived in the square in front of the Cairo central station where we waited to entrain.’