• Commercial Sweetheart Jewellery

    Thursday 11 September 2014 by Dianne Rutherford. 2 comments

    One thing we often get asked aboutis jewellery made during the First and Second World War. This blog will look at some exmaples of sweetheart jewellery produced by commercial companies and jewellers. Trench art sweetheart jewellery will be examined at a later date. This type of jewellery was often worn by female relatives, including girlfriends, wives or mothers as a symbol of pride, support and affection for a loved one serving in the armed …

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  • First to fight

    Wednesday 10 September 2014 by Michael Kelly. 1 comments

    The Bitapaka road. The first objective of the New Guinea expedition was the German wireless station at Bitapaka, a few miles inland from Blanche Bay, which at the outbreak of war was still in the course of construction, but was hurriedly finished and ready for use.

    At the battle of Bitapaka, the ANMEF were the first Australians in combat. The Bitapaka road. The first objective of the New Guinea expedition was the German wireless station at Bitapaka, a few miles inland from Blanche Bay, which at the outbreak of war was still in the course of construction, but was hurriedly finished and ready for use. A03146 The two scouts pushed into the thick…

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  • A hundred years on: the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF)

    Wednesday 10 September 2014 by David Heness.

    On 6 August 1914, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War, Australia agreed to a request by the British government to seize German wireless stations in the south-west Pacific, namely German New Guinea. Australia was also required to occupy the territory under the British flag and establish a military administration. For the first time, Britain called upon Australia to train, supply and command her own forces in defence of the empire. …

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  • The war that shaped Australia

    Tuesday 9 September 2014 by Karl James.

    Brothers and members of 453 Squadron RAAF, 402823 Flight Lieutenant John William (Jack)

    The war that shaped Australia “My Dear Mother … I entered this war with the knowledge that I had a rather small chance of coming out of it alive. I was under no false impression – I knew I had to kill – and perhaps be killed. Since I commenced flying I have spent probably the happiest time of my life … Above all, Mother dear, I have proved to my satisfaction that I was, at least, a man.”…

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  • AWM Summer Vacation Scholarship Scheme 2015 applications now open

    Friday 5 September 2014 by Michael Kelly.

    Applications are now open for the 2015 Australian War Memorial Summer Vacation Scholarship Scheme. They are awarded to history students who are undertaking postgraduate studies or are in the third or fourth year of an undergraduate course. The scholarships are also open to students enrolled in museum or public history courses. Applications should be received by 10 October 2014; the scholarships are tenable at the Memorial between 12 January and …

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  • Collection Detection #12

    Friday 5 September 2014 by John Holloway. 5 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #12 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it.

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  • Why it is not incorrect to speak of winning a Victoria Cross

    Wednesday 3 September 2014 by Robert Nichols. 6 comments

    Neville Howse

    It is often asserted that it is somehow disrespectful, or otherwise inappropriate, to speak of someone “winning a VC”. This is not so. It is, in fact, perfectly permissible – and sometimes unavoidable – to say that someone has won a Victoria Cross or some other bravery award. But why does this make some people uncomfortable? The reason seems to be because they see the term “win” as reserved for the outcomes of prizes or competitions. …

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  • Yarns – a new Memorial knitting publication

    Tuesday 2 September 2014 by Ashleigh Wadman. 13 comments

    Miss Coll knitting socks directly from a sheeps fleece in Melbourne, Victoria. The Australian Comforts Fund then packed the completed socks into bales - as seen to her left - and shipped them overseas to Australian troops.

    Miss Coll knitting socks directly from a sheeps fleece in Melbourne, Victoria. The Australian Comforts Fund then packed the completed socks into bales - as seen to her left - and shipped them overseas to Australian troops. H02438 The Memorial is seeking to publish Yarns: First World War Stories and Patterns from the Australian War Memorial’s Knitted Collections in April 2015. The …

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  • The first to fall

    Wednesday 27 August 2014 by Aaron Pegram. 5 comments

    Chisholm

    Among the first casulties of the First World War were Australians fighting in the British Army. On 26 August 1914, two weeks before the first action undertaken by Australian troops in the First World War, a 22-year-old lieutenant of the 1st Battalion East Lancashire Regiment lay mortally wounded by shrapnel in a cornfield outside the village of Ligny-en-Cambrésis. He had been in France for just three days. British and French troops had fought a …

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  • Inside the Anzac Connections project

    Tuesday 26 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 7 comments

    “…it is simply rotten here in the bad weather up to our knees in mud and water and no chance of getting dry …” The man who endured these conditions, Private John Collingwood Angus, 28th Battalion, was writing to his sister Nance, from France in May 1916. By 6 July he was killed but the letters he wrote were donated to the Australian War Memorial and his words now reverberate through time because of modern technology. My name is Daniel …

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