Friday 13 June 2014 by Vanessa Wright. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Collection, News Social media

On June 10 the Memorial participated in a Twitter event as part of International Archives Day, organised by Ask Archivists and Follow an Archive. Archives, museums and libraries from all over the world searched their collections for archive material relating to the First World War and posted it on Twitter using the hashtag #ww1archives.

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When we consider the many aircraft type which defended the skies above Australia and her territories, the P-40 Kittyhawk (Warhawk in American service) immediately springs to mind.  Indeed, the Kittyhawk would arguably be one of the most important fighters in service with the RAAF during the Second World War.  Though many veterans who served in the Northern Territory will recall with fondness, the sound of Merlin engines over the top end with the arrival of No.

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Friday 6 June 2014 by . 5 comments.
News Port Moresby, Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero, 75 Squadron RAAF, Book review

For some readers, it may come as a surprise that war in Papua and New Guinea did not start with fighting on the Kokoda Trail in July of 1942.  This is partly due to a plethora of books which cover this important land campaign; yet fail to fully integrate the air war into the story.  An exception to that statement is Lex McAulay’s Blood & Iron which made a creditable attempt to inform the reader of what was occurring in the skies above the track.

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Thursday 29 May 2014 by Robyn van Dyk. 2 comments.
Exhibitions, Anzac Voices

The Australian War Memorial is excited to announce that it has won highly commended for the temporary exhibition ANZAC voices at the Museum & Galleries National Awards (MAGNA) in Launceston, Tasmania last week. MAGNA celebrates the best exhibition work from around Australia.

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This is the second in a series of blogs about First World War uniforms and covers the basic aspects of the Australian Imperial Force other ranks uniform during the First World War.

At 11pm, on 4 August 1914, English time, Britain declared war on Germany. Australia immediately pledged her support and offered an initial force of 20,000 men. The offer was quickly accepted.

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Thursday 22 May 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments.
Education at the Memorial, News

Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for this week. As promised, here is the answer:

It is a German flechette dart – a sharpened projectile weapon which Australian soldier William Howie found lodged in a case of ration biscuits while in the trenches at Gallipoli. A lethal shower of these darts had just been dropped over Victoria Gully by an enemy aircraft.

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Wednesday 14 May 2014 by Ashleigh Wadman. 9 comments.
Collection, Military Heraldry and Technology First World War uniforms

This is the first in a series of blogs that covers the basic aspects of Australian uniforms during the First World War. There is a great diversity between nursing uniforms of the First World War. This variety is due to the fact that nursing uniforms were not centrally manufactured or issued in this war. Instead, nurses were given a uniform allowance to equip themselves and were allowed to make their own uniforms if they chose. This, and tailoring variations within Australia and overseas, led to considerable variety in the uniforms as can be seen in contemporary photographs.

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Friday 9 May 2014 by Eleni Holloway. 10 comments.
Collection, News family, Commemoration, RAAF, Roll of Honour, U-boat

Memorial gold brooch presented to John Freeth’s mother, Ethel. The portrait photograph in the pendant was a hand coloured copy of one taken in Piccadilly, London in 1943.

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Friday 9 May 2014 by . 2 comments.
Collection, Collection Highlights, News

Reading Room, Saturday 17 May 2014, 11.00am. Bookings are essential.

Have you ever wondered what happens to the military’s official documents?

Have you ever wondered how historians and academics access military documents and files for their research?

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