Friday 21 March 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories Uruzghan, Tarin Kot, Signaller, ANA

Day 11 - compartmentalising

The food is so good and plentiful at the Aussie mess, that we've divided our stomachs into compartments: we switch over to the "dessert stomach" when the main stomach is full.

The CO (Commanding Officer) of 7RAR (Royal Australian Regiment), the main army unit deployed in Uruzgan at present, also uses compartments but in a much more serious way.

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Friday 21 March 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories Tarin Kot, Tarin Kowt, ANA

Day 10 - Army aesthetics

When I arrived at Al Minhad Air Base (AMAB), I felt like I’d landed on the moon.  But Multinational Base Tarin Kowt, located in southern Afghanistan, is even more desolate and stark. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarinkot   There are no soft surfaces here. The base consists of shipping containers stacked beside razor wire, metal girders and steel staircases.

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Friday 21 March 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories Al Minhad, plane pulls, C130 Hercules, avionics

Day 8 - Brown bears, angry birds and plane pulls

Culture is a curious thing. We create it, shape it and mould it to suit ourselves and our circumstances.  The military has its own culture, which is characterised by conformity. Everyone looks the same (women have to wear their hair in a bun, men must be clean shaven, no jewellry is permitted), dresses in the same uniform and speaks the same lingo of abbreviations and acronymns strung together with verbs. 

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Friday 21 March 2014 by Kathleen Cusack. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, Memorial box banter, News

Dr Kylie Smith, pictured on the far left, during one of her presentations.Dr Kylie Smith, pictured on the far left, during one of her presentations.

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Thursday 20 March 2014 by John Holloway. 2 comments.
Education at the Memorial, News ACDSEH021

The Sydney Morning Herald, 6 August 1914. It took days for confirmation of Britain's entry into the war to reach Australia, even though mobilisation was already underway.

How did it come to this?

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Thursday 13 March 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories Aussie hero quilters, windmills, giraffes, HMAS Toowoomba

Day 7 - Patrol Boat

Today we spent the afternoon and evening in the Port of Rashid, Dubai, visiting HMAS Toowoomba. This large warship will spend nearly six months at sea. On board were one captain, 190 crew, a giraffe and a special quilt.

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Thursday 13 March 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories IEDs, Paul Kelly, Weapons of the Weak, landmines

Day 6 - 'From little things, big things grow'

An IED can be a very little thing. It sits just under the sand, waiting for a person or vehicle to step on it/drive over it, and boom!

Improvised Explosive Devices are like home made bombs or landmines. Terrorists will make them from anything they can get their hands on: plastic drink bottles, fertiliser, old batteries, alfoil, clothes pegs, and bits of old ordnance left behind by the Russians.

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Thursday 13 March 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories Ned Kelly, body armour, DSTO

Day 5 - Ned Kelly would be jealous

What do Ned Kelly and modern Australian soldiers have in common? Body armour! Ned fashioned his out of metal, while the scientists in the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) have spent years coming up with a sophisticated protective human shell. Like everything in the Australian Defence Force, it is commonly known by its abbreviation: MCBAS.

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Thursday 13 March 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories environment, Al Minhad, UAE

Day 4 - Moonscape

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