• Tobruk Diaries: Evacuating Benghazi

    Monday 28 March 2011 by .

    Bryant’s Diary: Friday 28th March 1941 We took up our position and we caught a couple of donkeys to carry most of our heavy gear up.  It is definitely impossible to dig in so we just cut out the middle of bushes to sleep in.  We do our own cooking and there are plenty of rations.  Away to the left are Bengasi and Benina and can only just be seen.  Our only problem is the carriage of water.  The Senoussi here seems friendly and offer us …

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  • Sarbi visits the Australian War Memorial

    Wednesday 23 March 2011 by . 1 comments

    Sarbi image Date: Tuesday 5 April 2011 at 1:00 pm Location: Animals in War Sculpture Garden Australian War Memorial Sarbi will be receiving a Purple Cross from the RSPCA Please do not bring animals to the event EDD (Explosive Detection Dog) Sarbi is an Australian Army working dog, please do not pat or crowd her

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  • The Bicycle in Warfare

    Wednesday 23 March 2011 by Ally Roche. 4 comments

    The bicycle is a machine that we can all relate to, it’s a common denominator.  Be that early childhood memories of the first ride down that steep hill, the freedom to go distances that would be problematic on foot or that flat tyre at the most inconvenient time. Today, bike technology has changed dramatically from the bikes that were being used in the First World War.  No carbon fibre frames or dual suspension shock absorbers, gears – what…

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Just ‘ordinary’ days

    Monday 21 March 2011 by .

    Bryant’s Diary: Friday 21st March 1941 Today was one of the lousiest days I’ve put in anywhere.  The weather was terrible.  The old Sahara Desert can be very nasty when it likes.  Sand is everywhere.  A warning order has arrived ready to move by night.  It might be tomorrow night.  Information has been received that some Wogs* are signalling to aircraft by placing their camels near objectives.  We’ll have to watch them. Bryant’s …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Sand Storms and Air Raids

    Monday 14 March 2011 by . 3 comments

    Bryant’s Diary:  Friday 14th March 1941 I had a cow of a night last night.  The wind became very strong and my eyes, ears, mouth and nose became choked with sand.  I spent all day making a dug out for myself.  It can do anything now.  As a matter of fact we had a shower of rain today, but it was only slight.  Still no more air raids. Bryant’s Diary:  Saturday 15th March 1941 Another dive-bomber came over this morning.  I let him have …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Planes, ships and automobiles

    Monday 7 March 2011 by . 1 comments

    Bryant’s Diary: Friday 7th March 1941 The convoy spread out more today and there were only six trucks to the mile.  As a result our truck didn’t leave until about 1 o’clock.  We had a bit of a shock when a large plane flew towards the convoy.  The truck pulled up and we dived out and took cover.  The plane turned out to be British and I bet the pilot laughed.  We passed through Barce, the ex-Italian aerodome and finally camped at …

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  • 'Our Hero We're Proud of Him' : Patriotic Crochet in the First World War

    Friday 4 March 2011 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

    Filet crochet was a popular craft before and during the First World War. Women would make decorative or functional items for the home such as tray cloths, milk jug covers, tea cosies, tablecloths and cushion covers. They also made decorative items for clothing, such as crochet lace collars or cuffs. During the First World War patriotic military themes were popular. Images such as ships, flags, soldiers and medals, along with slogans such as: …

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  • Close Shaves

    Thursday 3 March 2011 by Andrew Currey.

    “I had a very close shave...” (Pte C H Lester, 1 October 1917) As many soldiers will testify, war can be as much about luck as it is about training and equipment. Luck can take many forms, such as being in the right place at the right time, and the closely related not being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The men listed below are a few examples of these places and the sometimes very short distance between them. Lt William Henry Guard …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Illness, Moans and Mutiny

    Monday 28 February 2011 by .

    For information on the locations mentioned in this blog entry, see the Eastern Mediterranean map in chapter 1, page 5 of the Second War official histories: /cms_images/histories/19/chapters/01.pdf Bryant’s Diary: Friday 28th February 1941 We travelled all last night and arrived at East Kantara this morning where we had breakfast.  We crossed the Suez Canal and boarded a train.  We travelled all day for Mersa Matruh.  At a railway station …

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  • Lockheed Hudson - More Holes

    Friday 25 February 2011 by Jamie Croker.

    A second large hole has been cut into the fuselage this week, this being for the lower tunnel gun position.  A large amount of modification to the airframe had been carried out to support flooring, and various large camera mounts thorughout it's time as a geo survey platform.  All these modifications were removed to clear the area, and open up the space ogininally occupied by the tunnel gun.  Post war modifications to tunnel …

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