• Tobruk Diaries: Just ‘ordinary’ days

    Monday 21 March 2011 by .

    Bryant’s Diary: Friday 21st March 1941 Today was one of the lousiest days I’ve put in anywhere.  The weather was terrible.  The old Sahara Desert can be very nasty when it likes.  Sand is everywhere.  A warning order has arrived ready to move by night.  It might be tomorrow night.  Information has been received that some Wogs* are signalling to aircraft by placing their camels near objectives.  We’ll have to watch them. Bryant’s …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Sand Storms and Air Raids

    Monday 14 March 2011 by . 3 comments

    Bryant’s Diary:  Friday 14th March 1941 I had a cow of a night last night.  The wind became very strong and my eyes, ears, mouth and nose became choked with sand.  I spent all day making a dug out for myself.  It can do anything now.  As a matter of fact we had a shower of rain today, but it was only slight.  Still no more air raids. Bryant’s Diary:  Saturday 15th March 1941 Another dive-bomber came over this morning.  I let him have …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Planes, ships and automobiles

    Monday 7 March 2011 by . 1 comments

    Bryant’s Diary: Friday 7th March 1941 The convoy spread out more today and there were only six trucks to the mile.  As a result our truck didn’t leave until about 1 o’clock.  We had a bit of a shock when a large plane flew towards the convoy.  The truck pulled up and we dived out and took cover.  The plane turned out to be British and I bet the pilot laughed.  We passed through Barce, the ex-Italian aerodome and finally camped at …

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  • 'Our Hero We're Proud of Him' : Patriotic Crochet in the First World War

    Friday 4 March 2011 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

    Filet crochet was a popular craft before and during the First World War. Women would make decorative or functional items for the home such as tray cloths, milk jug covers, tea cosies, tablecloths and cushion covers. They also made decorative items for clothing, such as crochet lace collars or cuffs. During the First World War patriotic military themes were popular. Images such as ships, flags, soldiers and medals, along with slogans such as: …

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  • Close Shaves

    Thursday 3 March 2011 by Andrew Currey.

    “I had a very close shave...” (Pte C H Lester, 1 October 1917) As many soldiers will testify, war can be as much about luck as it is about training and equipment. Luck can take many forms, such as being in the right place at the right time, and the closely related not being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The men listed below are a few examples of these places and the sometimes very short distance between them. Lt William Henry Guard …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Illness, Moans and Mutiny

    Monday 28 February 2011 by .

    For information on the locations mentioned in this blog entry, see the Eastern Mediterranean map in chapter 1, page 5 of the Second War official histories: /cms_images/histories/19/chapters/01.pdf Bryant’s Diary: Friday 28th February 1941 We travelled all last night and arrived at East Kantara this morning where we had breakfast.  We crossed the Suez Canal and boarded a train.  We travelled all day for Mersa Matruh.  At a railway station …

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  • Lockheed Hudson - More Holes

    Friday 25 February 2011 by Jamie Croker.

    A second large hole has been cut into the fuselage this week, this being for the lower tunnel gun position.  A large amount of modification to the airframe had been carried out to support flooring, and various large camera mounts thorughout it's time as a geo survey platform.  All these modifications were removed to clear the area, and open up the space ogininally occupied by the tunnel gun.  Post war modifications to tunnel …

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  • World War One treasure trove found

    Friday 25 February 2011 by Peter Burness. 29 comments

    Vignacourt is an old rural village in France, larger than most, 12 kilometres north of the city of Amiens. During the First World War it stood behind the front-line of the Somme fighting, although the action was never far away and soldiers were always present.  For much of the time it was a forward rest area where troops arrived to recover from recent battle and prepare for the next. Men were billeted in the houses, lofts, stables and barns, and…

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  • Governor-General officially opens the Memorial's Hall of Valour

    Thursday 24 February 2011 by LEUT Debra Holland.

    Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, Ms Quentin Bryce AC, with Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith VC MG, in the Hall of Valour, 21 February 2011. Before a gathering that included living Victoria Cross holders Keith Payne VC OAM, Corporal Mark Donaldson VC, Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith VC MG, Her Excellency Ms Quentin Bryce AC, the Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia officially opened the Hall of Valour on Monday…

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  • Tobruk Diaries: They're off: Moving on

    Monday 21 February 2011 by .

    Bryant's Diary: Friday 21st February 1941 Retired back to Wadi Chariar and took up positions in old Turkish trenches.   Cosgriff's Diary: Friday 21st February 1941 Pino Defunctis [For the Dead].  Slept in to 7:15.  Used private fruit knife at breakfast.  Found Byrne Nolee a Catholic.  Photos turned out...O.K.  Sent parcel to Elsa.  Letters to her and Jas Carragher.  Tom Steele back from Nile Boat.  John and Len on getting “stinkin” …

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