• A sombre duty.

    Wednesday 5 November 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 1 comments

    Graves Registration Detachment, Australian section, of the Imperial War Graves Unit

    “We will be a hard headed crowd when we get back, after the sights we see…” This is a line from a letter written by Henry George Whiting, who volunteered for the grisly but vitally important task of exhuming dead allied soldiers, identifying them and reburying them into organised cemeteries. Whiting was born on 27 March 1889 at Adelong, New South Wales, one of eighteen children born to James and Annie Elizabeth Whiting (née Schafer). He…

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  • "He taught us all how to die..."

    Monday 3 November 2014 by David Heness. 1 comments

    Douglas Barrett-Lennard and the Western Australians of the 8th Australian Field Artillery Battery Of such mettle were the men who, under the most insuperable difficulties of Anzac, fought their guns throughout the campaign. C. E. W. Bean in The Official History of Australia in the War of 1914-1918: Volume II, The Story of Anzac: from 4 May, 1915 to the Evacuation When Charles Bean, Australia’s official First World War historian, wrote this, …

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  • Dig Deeper - The first convoy

    Friday 31 October 2014 by John Holloway. 2 comments

    Charles Bryant, First convoy at sea, 1920, oil on canvas, 122.5 cm x 275.3 cm, AWM ART00190 Australia’s involvement in the Great War led to many "firsts" – but few as fateful as the day the very first convoy of Australian and New Zealand troops left Albany, in Western Australia, for a journey into the most devastating conflict in Australia’s history. It was exactly 100 years ago tomorrow – 1 November 1914. A century on, the Albany convoy …

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  • Nursing for the British Raj

    Tuesday 28 October 2014 by Ashleigh Wadman. 2 comments

    Suitcase of Staff Nurse Vera Agnes Paisley.

    The interest in the Australian Army Nursing Service (AANS) during the Great War was recently encouraged by the screening of ANZAC Girls and the publication that inspired it, The Other ANZACS: Nurses at War, 1914-1918 by Peter Rees. Both of these focus on nursing services off the Gallipoli Peninsula and on Lemnos and the Western Front in its various guises: hospital ships, field hospitals and casualty clearing stations. We see our girls working …

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  • Rendering a small service to Italy in 1917

    Monday 27 October 2014 by Dianne Rutherford.

    The damaged Isonzo bridge at Gorizia, Italy.

    Several years ago, when I worked in the Memorial’s Research Centre, One collection item I researched was a wonderful and very rare Australian Imperial Force (AIF) map of the Italian front, held in the Memorial’s collection. This item is very unusual in the Memorial’s collection, if for no other reason that the AIF was not involved in the fighting on this front. However, in October 1917, some Australians map makers rendered Italy a small …

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  • What have we learned? - The Australian experience of war and the Australian Curriculum

    Wednesday 22 October 2014 by Stuart Baines. 2 comments

    Military history plays an important part in defining chapters in the history of individual nations. Its impacts reach into most aspects of life and experience not only during the time of conflict but also before and after the event. Isolating the period of conflict from the social or political history has the potential to become an orchard in which the fruit of myth grows ripe. Some argue that in the context of Australia’s experience the notion…

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  • Reproducing Sister Lummer’s Ward Dress - Part 2

    Tuesday 21 October 2014 by Eleni Holloway. 2 comments

    Australian Army Nurse arrange for display with original cuffs, collar, apron and cape in the new First World War galleries. The only visible parts of the replica ward dress are the sleeves and skirt.

    Australian Army Nurse arrange for display with original cuffs, collar, apron and cape in the new First World War galleries. The only visible parts of the replica ward dress are the sleeves and skirt. In this blog I have briefly documented the steps that curators and conservators took to produce a First World War replica ward dress. This follows on from Part 1 which focused on the history of Sister Lummer’s dress, and the conservation …

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  • A different kind of heroism

    Friday 17 October 2014 by Theresa Cronk.

    This blog post was written by Anne Landais, a French student from the Ecole Nationale des Chartes (National School of Palaeography and Archival Studies), which isa university level institution that prepares students in the human and social sciences for careers in history related domains. The current priorities of the Ecole Nationale des Chartes include the development of digital technologies applied to historical research and heritage studies, …

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  • Work continues on the FWW dioramas!

    Friday 17 October 2014 by Alana Treasure. 6 comments

    Somme Winter

    Our apologies that it has been a while since our last FWW Dioramas conservation posting - it'sbeen a big year!! Along with continued cleaning and repairs, some of the tasks and activities we've been spending our time on this year are moulding and casting missing weapons, repairing broken weapons and re-joining the previously cut pieces of diorama bases requiring filling and inpainting. The Semakh diorama has been returned to display in the …

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  • Memorial Box Banter - Part VI

    Friday 17 October 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Concerned about the new curriculum? We can help! Exploring primary and secondary sources in the classroom can seem like a daunting prospect but the new Australian curriculum provides an exciting opportunity for students to put their hands on history. The University of New England’s School of Education recently borrowed a First World War Memorial Box to show their Bachelor of Education (Primary) students how to use the items as part …

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