• Final stage of the evacuation from Anzac Cove: narrative from battalion war diaries

    Friday 18 December 2015 by . 3 comments

    The evacuation of Anzac – position at 1.30am, 20th December 1915, immediately before the departure of the “C” parties

    Part 3 in a series of three blog posts about the evacuation from Gallipoli The evacuation of Gallipoli began on 22 November 1915, when a plan was adopted during a conference at General Headquarters, Mudros. This was after Lord Kitchener's visit to Gallipoli in early November, during which he told General Birdwood to start thinking about how to evacuate, and before the recommendation was approved by British Parliament. Charles Bean, the official …

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  • An Australian in the Air Transport Auxiliary

    Tuesday 15 December 2015 by Dianne Rutherford.

    Some members of the Air Transport Auxiliary

    The Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) played an important role in the air war in Europe during the Second World War and the Memorial is pleased to add to the collection the uniform of an Australian, First Officer Ian Robert Llewellyn, who served in the ATA from 1943. Some members of the Air Transport Auxiliary 006308 A civilian organisation, the ATA was responsible for ferrying of all …

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  • Lee Kernaghan - “Outstanding Achievement Award” for Spirit of the Anzacs

    Thursday 10 December 2015 by Brendan Nelson.

    Photo Courtesy Sam MacDonald

    It was with absolute pleasure and pride that I had the opportunity to present my good friend Lee Kernaghan the Outstanding Achievement Award for his album Spirit of the Anzacs at the ARIAs on 26 November 2015. It was a wonderful and poignant moment when the large crowd paused and paid their respects to this moving tribute from one of Australia’s great story tellers which puts the words of Australian soldiers to music. Lee and his collaborator …

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  • Intermediary stage of the evacuation from Anzac Cove: narrative from battalion war diaries

    Tuesday 8 December 2015 by . 2 comments

    Map of Gallipoli

    Part 2 in a series of three blog posts about the evacuation from Gallipoli Map of Gallipoli SC02009 The evacuation of Gallipoli began on 22 November 1915, when a plan was adopted during a conference at General Headquarters, Mudros. This was after Lord Kitchener's visit to Gallipoli in early November, during which he told General Birdwood to start thinking about how to evacuate, and …

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  • Highlight on official records of the First World War: AWM7 - Troopship records, 1914-1918 War

    Monday 30 November 2015 by Craig Berelle.

    Highlight on the official records of the First World War is a centenary program of posts highlighting those records created 100 years ago, whythey exist and how we can help make these essential records available for research purposes. Function and provenance AWM7 records the logistic processes involved in transporting the AIF to Europe and back again, in the form of movement orders, war diaries, nominal rolls and telegrams. The logistics of …

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  • How to make a "Butterfly" belt

    Tuesday 24 November 2015 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

    Butterfly belt made in New Guinea late in the war.

    Butterfly belt made in New Guinea late in the war. REL/21579.002 One thing I like to try and do with items held in the Memorial's collection is to get an understanding of how they were made or how they were used. So thought I would investigate how Australian soldiers made the beautiful butterfly belts we hold in our collection. Made from pieces of butterfly wing, cigarette packet …

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  • Preliminary stage of the evacuation from Anzac Cove: narrative from battalion war diaries

    Monday 23 November 2015 by . 4 comments

    Map of Gallipoli

    Map of Gallipoli SC02009 Theevacuation ofGallipoli began on 22 November 1915, when a plan was adopted during a conference at General Headquarters, Mudros. This was after Lord Kitchener's visit to Gallipoli in early November, during which he told General Birdwood to start thinking about how to evacuate, and before the recommendation was approved by British Parliament. Charles Bean, …

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  • Claustrophobia in the Desert

    Tuesday 17 November 2015 by Melissa Cadden. 1 comments

    View from Patrol Base (PB) Wali.

    As one of our Soldier in Resident program participants, James Fowler, a veteran of Afghanistan who is now based in Townsville, spent some time with The Memorial’s collection of Afghanistan photographs. The following images resonated with James when recalling his own time in Afghanistan. In James’ words, a peaceful patrol through the “stark beauty” of a wide Afghan dasht (or desert plain) can turn “in an instant” to “claustrophobia …

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  • A godsent Christmas box for the world

    Tuesday 10 November 2015 by . 1 comments

    Compiègne, France.  A postcard of  French and English representatives beside a train carriage after the German representatives signed the Armistice documents which signalled the end of the First ...

    It was at 11 o'clock on the morning of Monday 11th November 1918 thatthat day finally came. Soldiers, from both sides, had hung onby clinging to the promise of that day. It meant the chance to embrace their families and friends once more after years apart. It meant the chance to be clean and dry, rather than knee deep in mud and infested with lice. It meant the chance to return to a place where the air was filled with things other than bullets …

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  • Sabotage!

    Thursday 5 November 2015 by Dianne Rutherford.

    An army marches on its stomach, or so the saying goes. Certainly the supply of food, equipment and weapons was such an important aspect of the First World War that it was targeted by both sides. German ports were blockaded throughout much of the war, leading to a decline in quality and quantity of German clothing, equipment and food as the war progressed. The Germans disrupted the supply of items to Britain through sinking ships bound for their …

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