Wednesday 3 September 2014 by Robert Nichols. 6 comments.
News, Opinion, views and commentary Victoria Cross

It is often asserted that it is somehow disrespectful, or otherwise inappropriate, to speak of someone “winning a VC”. This is not so. It is, in fact, perfectly permissible – and sometimes unavoidable – to say that someone has won a Victoria Cross or some other bravery award.

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Wednesday 27 August 2014 by Aaron Pegram. 5 comments.
First World War Centenary, Opinion, views and commentary, Wartime

Among the first casulties of the First World War were Australians fighting in the British Army.

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Tuesday 26 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 6 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections

“…it is simply rotten here in the bad weather up to our knees in mud and water and no chance of getting dry …”

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Wednesday 20 August 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments.
Education at the Memorial, News Primary source, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, First World War, ACDSEH021, ACDSEH096

How would you measure up?

With the outbreak of war in August 1914, Australia began an official recruiting effort to raise an army to send overseas. However, the Australian Imperial Force (AIF), as it was named, would not take just anyone. It was intended to be a force of skilled, experienced soldiers, chosen from “the fittest, strongest, and most ardent in the land”.1

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Monday 18 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 14 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Family history, Personal Stories

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

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Wednesday 13 August 2014 by Ashleigh Wadman. 17 comments.
Collection, Military Heraldry and Technology First World War uniforms

This is one in a series of blogs that covers the basic aspects of Australian uniforms during the First World War. There is a great diversity between nursing uniforms of the First World War. This variety is due to the fact that nursing uniforms were not centrally manufactured or issued in this war. Instead, nurses were given a uniform allowance to equip themselves and were allowed to make their own uniforms if they chose. This, and tailoring variations within Australia and overseas, led to considerable variety in the uniforms as can be seen in contemporary photographs.

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Given it’s the final month of another chilly winter here in Canberra, I felt it was fitting to share with you one of the cosiest objects on display at the Memorial: Corporal Clifford Gatenby’s embroidered blanket. Its unique design has captivated visitors with its richly embroidered images from across the globe, as well as the more familiar symbols of Australia. It is also a rare example of an object of its size to have been created in a prisoner of war camp and to have survived.

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Wednesday 6 August 2014 by Jayne Simpson. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, First World War Centenary, News Commemorative Crosses

Children writing messages on Commemorative Crosses

“Your spirit astounds us
Your bravery inspires us
Your courage awes us
Your sacrifice strengthens us...”

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Tuesday 5 August 2014 by Chris Goddard. 2 comments.
Collection Highlights, Military Heraldry and Technology Jewellery, Watch fobs, First World War

Engraved jewellery was frequently presented to departing and returning soldiers by local shire councils and ‘Farewell’ or ‘Welcome Home’ committees during the First World War. Also known as ‘Tribute’ jewellery, these were presented in public ceremonies or dinners and often reported in the local press.  With some diligent searching, these reports can be located by searching newspaper databases such as ‘Trove’. As the jewellery was engraved and dated, you can use this information to narrow your search.

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