Monday 24 December 2007 by Mal Booth.
Exhibitions, Lawrence of Arabia and the Light Horse Our exhibition

Here are some images of the exhibition. We haven't got the professional photos yet, so these are just my snaps. They'll be good enough to give you a look at most of the features we have on display. (I still need to add a couple that I seem to have missed when I took these, so check back sometime in January 2008.)

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At last we have James Barr's talk available as an audio file that you can listen to here, while browsing some of his 28 photos or after downloading it using the link below. Thanks again to James for his time and his generosity with these photos. Now go out and buy his book Setting the desert on fire!

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Download the MP3 audio file (13.9MB)

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Well, the exhibition is now open and my feet have barely hit the ground since. When things slow down I'll post some images and information about the opening, but currently I am still spending about 3-4 hours a day running tours as the exhibition seems pretty popular so far. Don't panic! It is open until 25 May 2008.

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Wednesday 12 December 2007 by Bridie Kirkpatrick.
Conservation

Background

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Wednesday 12 December 2007 by Bridie Kirkpatrick.
Conservation

Background

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Monday 10 December 2007 by Peter Burness.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918 Aerial Operations

Four Australian squadrons flew operationally. No.1 Squadron AFC had a unique role, serving in Egypt, Palestine and Syria. Its airmen undertook reconnaissance and bombing and were often drawn into aerial combat. Lieutenant Frank McNamara won the Victoria Cross for rescuing a downed comrade under fire; it was the first to an Australian airman.

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Friday 7 December 2007 by Peter Burness.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918 Training

Friday 7 December 2007 by Peter Burness. 1 comments
Aircraft 1914 - 1918 The War Theatres

The bold exploits of the fighter pilots caught the attention of the public. Aerial duels fought by young men in the clear skies satisfied the heroic notion of warfare; something that the bloody trench fighting could no longer do. Each nation had its air heroes, although many of them had only short lives. Those who destroyed five enemy aircraft were referred to as ‘aces’. The greatest of these, of any side, was the German, Manfred von Richthofen, who shot down 80 opponents. The top British ‘ace’ was Edward ‘Mick’ Mannock.

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Our installation is almost complete now and we will open tonight. This week a few of us have done a lot of media interviews, so it looks to be attracting a good deal of attention already.

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