Wednesday 13 August 2014 by Ashleigh Wadman. 17 comments.
Collection, Military Heraldry and Technology First World War uniforms

This is one in a series of blogs that covers the basic aspects of Australian uniforms during the First World War. There is a great diversity between nursing uniforms of the First World War. This variety is due to the fact that nursing uniforms were not centrally manufactured or issued in this war. Instead, nurses were given a uniform allowance to equip themselves and were allowed to make their own uniforms if they chose. This, and tailoring variations within Australia and overseas, led to considerable variety in the uniforms as can be seen in contemporary photographs.

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Given it’s the final month of another chilly winter here in Canberra, I felt it was fitting to share with you one of the cosiest objects on display at the Memorial: Corporal Clifford Gatenby’s embroidered blanket. Its unique design has captivated visitors with its richly embroidered images from across the globe, as well as the more familiar symbols of Australia. It is also a rare example of an object of its size to have been created in a prisoner of war camp and to have survived.

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Wednesday 6 August 2014 by Jayne Simpson. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, First World War Centenary, News Commemorative Crosses

Children writing messages on Commemorative Crosses

“Your spirit astounds us
Your bravery inspires us
Your courage awes us
Your sacrifice strengthens us...”

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Tuesday 5 August 2014 by Chris Goddard. 2 comments.
Collection Highlights, Military Heraldry and Technology Jewellery, Watch fobs, First World War

Engraved jewellery was frequently presented to departing and returning soldiers by local shire councils and ‘Farewell’ or ‘Welcome Home’ committees during the First World War. Also known as ‘Tribute’ jewellery, these were presented in public ceremonies or dinners and often reported in the local press.  With some diligent searching, these reports can be located by searching newspaper databases such as ‘Trove’. As the jewellery was engraved and dated, you can use this information to narrow your search.

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Friday 1 August 2014 by Jennifer Milward. 7 comments.
Collection, Personal Stories Warilda, troopships, First World War

In August 1915, the SS Warilda was requisitioned by the Commonwealth and fitted out as a transport ship. HMAT Warilda made two trips to Egypt and one to England, carrying more than 7,000 troops. Following the Warilda’s conversion to a hospital ship in July 1916, she spent a few months stationed in the Mediterranean, before being put to work transporting patients across the English Channel. Between late 1916 and August 1918 she made over 180 trips from Le Havre to Southampton, carrying approximately 80,000 patients.

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Friday 1 August 2014 by Dianne Rutherford. 10 comments.
Collection, Military Heraldry and Technology First World War uniforms, badges

This is one of a series of blogs about First World War uniforms and covers the basic aspects of badges seen on Australian Imperial Force uniforms. It does not cover unofficial unit badges, or qualification or proficiency badges. These may be covered at a later date.

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In this WW1 themed sound reel four Australian men voice their experiences of the Imperial Camel Corps.

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eX de Medici's "Australia, special forces (everywhere, current), Aust flag 2010", depicts a Special Forces cutaway helmet in its current colour scheme. ART94355

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Many people tend to associate embroidery and needlework with women and the comfort of the homefront, but men are also known to pick up the needle and thread, especially it seems during times of war.  Whether stitched as a way to pass the time in a prisoner of war camp, to record events, places and names, or as rehabilitation therapy in military hospitals, embroidered items have many interesting stories to share.  To celebrate World Embroidery Day, 30 July, here are some examples of First World War rehabilitation embroidery from the Memorial’s National Collection, and stories of th

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