• A Bush hospital in the heart of England

    Tuesday 7 June 2016 by Craig Blanch. 4 comments

    Bishops Knoll

    The Great War had already entered its third year by the time the first edition of Coo-ee!, the magazine of one of the most remarkable “Australian” military hospitals of the war, was released. Coo-ee!, first published in England on 10 November 1916, was the journal of the Bishop’s Knoll War Hospital. The inaugural edition was dedicated “to the first thousand sick and wounded Australian soldiers who were patients at Bishop’s …

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  • New addition to the digitisation team

    Friday 3 June 2016 by Kathryn Hicks. 1 comments

    A3 Flatbed Scanner

    The digitisation team in the Research Centre recentlywelcomed a new member to our scanning family. Currently our small team is responsible for all of the imaging of Research Centre items which go out to the web. This includes the Reports of Proceedings and Anzac Connections project. Up until now the images have been scanned using only flatbed scanners and a wide format map scanner. One of our A3 Flatbed Scanner Our Wide-format …

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  • Anzac Connections: digitising the music of the First World War

    Tuesday 31 May 2016 by Meagan Nihill.

    The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the Anzacs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. As part of this project, we are hoping to digitise and make available online the pieces of sheet music listed below. Included are the names of people associated with these songs: composers, lyricists, arrangers, etc. If you are related to any of these …

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  • Australians on the Western Front 1916 - 100 years ago

    Thursday 26 May 2016 by . 3 comments

    “We thought we knew something of the horrors of war, but we were mere recruits, and have had our full education in one day.”Ronald Alison McInnis 19 July, 1916 This year marks the centenary of Australia’s first year on the Western Front. It was to become a year of terrible sacrifice. The experiences of some Australians who served in 1916 are preserved in the Memorial’s archive and are now available online. From the battlefield …

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  • ANZAC Connections: Centenary digitisation project

    Monday 21 March 2016 by Stephanie Hume.

    The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war, through the digitisation of collections held by the Memorial. The collections are selected from our extensive archive and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses, and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. …

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  • Forgotten star

    Friday 22 January 2016 by Stephanie Hume. 6 comments

    Robert Chisholm was born William Leslie Chisholm on 18 April 1894 in Melbourne, Victoria. He was one of six children, born to Annie (née Absalom) and Robert Chisholm. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) on 23 November 1915, joining the Australian Army Service Corps as a driver. He embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT Persic on 22 December 1916. Upon arrival in France he was attached to the 2nd Australian Divisional …

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  • Final stage of the evacuation from Anzac Cove: narrative from battalion war diaries

    Friday 18 December 2015 by . 3 comments

    The evacuation of Anzac – position at 1.30am, 20th December 1915, immediately before the departure of the “C” parties

    Part 3 in a series of three blog posts about the evacuation from Gallipoli The evacuation of Gallipoli began on 22 November 1915, when a plan was adopted during a conference at General Headquarters, Mudros. This was after Lord Kitchener's visit to Gallipoli in early November, during which he told General Birdwood to start thinking about how to evacuate, and before the recommendation was approved by British Parliament. Charles Bean, the …

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  • Preliminary stage of the evacuation from Anzac Cove: narrative from battalion war diaries

    Monday 23 November 2015 by . 4 comments

    Map of Gallipoli

    Map of Gallipoli SC02009 Theevacuation ofGallipoli began on 22 November 1915, when a plan was adopted during a conference at General Headquarters, Mudros. This was after Lord Kitchener's visit to Gallipoli in early November, during which he told General Birdwood to start thinking about how to evacuate, and before the recommendation was approved by British Parliament. …

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  • A godsent Christmas box for the world

    Tuesday 10 November 2015 by . 1 comments

    Compiègne, France.  A postcard of  French and English representatives beside a train carriage after the German representatives signed the Armistice documents which signalled the end of the First ...

    It was at 11 o'clock on the morning of Monday 11th November 1918 thatthat day finally came. Soldiers, from both sides, had hung onby clinging to the promise of that day. It meant the chance to embrace their families and friends once more after years apart. It meant the chance to be clean and dry, rather than knee deep in mud and infested with lice. It meant the chance to return to a place where the air was filled with things other than …

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  • ANZAC Connections: Centenary digitisation project

    Monday 2 November 2015 by Stephanie Hume. 1 comments

    The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s …

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