• A different kind of heroism

    Friday 17 October 2014 by Theresa Cronk.

    This blog post was written by Anne Landais, a French student from the Ecole Nationale des Chartes (National School of Palaeography and Archival Studies), which isa university level institution that prepares students in the human and social sciences for careers in history related domains. The current priorities of the Ecole Nationale des Chartes include the development of digital technologies applied to historical research and heritage …

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  • Fourteen.

    Friday 10 October 2014 by David Heness. 18 comments

    Studio portrait of 1553 Private (Pte) James (Jim) Martin, 1st Reinforcements, 21st Battalion, of Hawthorn, Vic.

    Private James Charles Martin was in a bad state. Exhausted and suffering from a high fever, he lay aboard the hospital ship Glenart Castle under the watchful eye of Matron Frances Hope Logie Reddoch. Jim was nearly fifteen thousand kilometres from his family in Hawthorn, Victoria. He had lost over half his weight serving in the squalor of the trenches at Gallipoli and had contracted typhoid fever. Soldiers often contracted the disease in…

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  • Below the surface of Naval Reports of Proceedings

    Wednesday 8 October 2014 by Meagan Nihill. 2 comments

    “On Saturday, 1 September, I was accorded the privilege of giving away the Bride at the marriage between Miss Caroline Elizabeth Edwards and ABUC Gordon Stephen Dempsey…A small wedding reception was held, after the ceremony, in my cabin.” This anecdote appears as Paragraph 10 of the Report of Proceedings for HMAS Stuart in August 1968. Surrounded by perfunctory remarks on the ship’s movements, training regimes, and the health …

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  • Australian Naval Force (ANF) Engagement and Service Records now online

    Tuesday 23 September 2014 by Meagan Nihill. 3 comments

    The Research Centre has now digitised and made available online the seriesAWM266 Australian Naval Force (ANF) Engagement and Service Records, 1903-1911. The records in this series relate to men and boys – mainly residents of Australia and New Zealand – who served in the Australian Squadron of the Royal Navy under the terms of the Naval Agreement Act of 1903. Similar to attestation papers of soldiers in the First World War, they …

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  • Anzac Connections: 50 000 pages and counting!

    Monday 15 September 2014 by Theresa Cronk. 6 comments

    Scanning the first page of Anzac Connections: Batch 6

    Today marks an important event in the annals of the Australian War Memorial’s centenary digitisation project, Anzac Connections. 50 000 pages have now been scanned for online access by all Australians and international researchers. This milestone comes as we celebrate the release of another thirty-eight personal collections to supplement the 153 collections already available online. Each of these collections provides a fascinating …

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  • A hundred years on: the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF)

    Wednesday 10 September 2014 by David Heness.

    On 6 August 1914, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War, Australia agreed to a request by the British government to seize German wireless stations in the south-west Pacific, namely German New Guinea. Australia was also required to occupy the territory under the British flag and establish a military administration. For the first time, Britain called upon Australia to train, supply and command her own forces in defence of the …

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  • Inside the Anzac Connections project

    Tuesday 26 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 7 comments

    “…it is simply rotten here in the bad weather up to our knees in mud and water and no chance of getting dry …” The man who endured these conditions, Private John Collingwood Angus, 28th Battalion, was writing to his sister Nance, from France in May 1916. By 6 July he was killed but the letters he wrote were donated to the Australian War Memorial and his words now reverberate through time because of modern technology. My name is…

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  • ANZAC Connections: Centenary digitisation project

    Monday 18 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 14 comments

    The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s …

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  • “Your brothers were laying there, they had been killed…”

    Friday 27 June 2014 by David Heness. 7 comments

    The Allen brothers with their family.

    Privates Stephen Charles Allen and Robert Beattie Allen were literally brothers-in-arms. The brothers from Manly in New South Wales had enlisted within a week of each other in July 1915, both with the 13th Infantry Battalion. After embarking from Australia in September of that year the brothers were first sent to Egypt for several months. Unaware of the conditions that awaited them at the Western Front they, like many others, were …

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  • Wartime records of General John Monash available online

    Thursday 26 June 2014 by Robyn van Dyk. 5 comments

    General John Monash is considered one of the war’s outstanding commanders. Monash was an avid collector, and his papers held at the Memorial give a comprehensive view of his wartime military career: from his command of the 4th Australian Brigade on Gallipoli to the Australian Corps in 1918, and then his role as Director General of Demobilisation and Repatriation of the AIF at war’s end. His handwritten notes, diaries, letters, draft …

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