Tuesday 26 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 6 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections

“…it is simply rotten here in the bad weather up to our knees in mud and water and no chance of getting dry …”

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Monday 18 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 14 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Family history, Personal Stories

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

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Thursday 26 June 2014 by Robyn van Dyk. 5 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection

General John Monash is considered one of the war’s outstanding commanders. Monash was an avid collector, and his papers held at the Memorial give a comprehensive view of his wartime military career: from his command of the 4th Australian Brigade on Gallipoli to the Australian Corps in 1918, and then his role as Director General of Demobilisation and Repatriation of the AIF at war’s end.

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Thursday 24 April 2014 by Robyn van Dyk. 5 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection

On the eve of landing at Gallipoli, 99 years ago, Sergeant Apcar De Vine of the 4th battalion took pen to paper to write of his preparations for the landing. Under orders to sail at 12am he records a meal of tea, bully beef and eggs. He describes packing iron rations for three days. “Two tins of Bully Beef, tea, sugar, biscuits, 2 cubes of Bovril, also rations for the first day of landing, bully-beef and biscuits, we had to rearrange our packs to get all the food in, also an extra ration of water ... in an empty lemonade bottle”. He also packed a billy to boil water for tea.

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Thursday 17 April 2014 by David Heness. 4 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection, Personal Stories

Private Cecil Anthony McAnulty was barely able to stand. Exhausted from the intense fighting of the previous two days, he used a brief period of respite to pen his experiences of the past few days to paper. Cecil had written in his diary every day since he had left Australia. When he had completely filled his first diary he began a second, writing on whatever scraps of paper he could find and often using the backs of envelopes sent from home. For many soldiers writing helped them make sense of what was happening.

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Wednesday 16 April 2014 by Robyn van Dyk. 2 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Personal Stories

Bringing historic documents from the Australian War Memorial’s archive to all Australians

The first 150 collections of private records related to individuals who served in the First World War are now online and hold a wealth of stories. In the centenary year of the First World War, the Memorial has launched one of its major commemorative projects to make available the rare historic personal records of Australians who served.

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Monday 20 January 2014 by Nick Crofts. 12 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war.  The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

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Friday 20 December 2013 by Theresa Cronk. 2 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, News, Personal Stories

On 20 December 1915, Private John Kingsley Gammage of the 1st Infantry Battalion wrote in his diary, This concludes a real experience that money could not buy with an enemy that fought fairly and clean. Gammage was one of the last 10 000 Australian troops remaining at Anzac Cove. These men departed Anzac Cove during the night of Sunday 19 December through into the early hours of Monday 20 December 1915. The preparations for their departure had been carefully planned down to the finest details.

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Thursday 19 December 2013 by Robyn van Dyk. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection, Exhibitions, Anzac Voices

 

I would not have joined this contingent if I had known that they were not going to England.

                                           Private John Simpson, 3rd Field Ambulance, Christmas Day 1914

 

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