Monday 21 April 2014 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2014, News

Today is always my favourite day of the trip. It is the day that I get to be part of the students  and teachers first taste of the Gallipoli peninsula. It always reminds me of my first steps here and the enormous and profound effect it had on me. Until that time I had focused my studies on the later action on the Western Front. I never understood why a sideshow campaign with comparatively small losses could be so etched into our collective consciousness. Since that time I have always looked for ways that I can share the importance of this experience.

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Monday 21 April 2014 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2014, News

Today has been a day of contrasts. This morning we walked down one of the major boulevards in the old city, down towards the Hippodrome and beside the Blue Mosque and Haigia Sophia.  A beautiful pink and orange sky accompanied us as well as our usual pack of local dogs. With the exception of our little band the streets were virtually empty, the only consistent presence was the Turkish street sweepers that we came across every 100 or so metres. We returned to where we walked after breakfast to start our days activities and we encountered a sea of tourists.

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Saturday 19 April 2014 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2014, News

Day two of this experience and we were lucky enough  to visit some of the most amazing sites of Isatanbul. One in particular, Chora Church Museum gives a particularly interesting window into the layered history of this city. The more time we spend looking into this city and its treasures the more I hope we can start painting a picture of the Turkish people for the students. These are a people with a much longer and in some respects, more complicated history than white Australia and it makes all the more interesting the shared experience of the men at Gallipoli. 

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Saturday 27 April 2013 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2012

Today was a sad day for us all. Leaving the Gallipoli peninsula and leaving behind all those boys from all nations is difficult. We as a group have paid our respects and honoured the men from all sides. It is hard in such a short time, to give a full perspective of the campaign but I am sure that the students and teachers alike are leaving with a new sense of what Gallipoli means and what it was all about.

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Friday 26 April 2013 by Stuart Baines. 3 comments.
ANZAC Connections, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2012

Today was the day, the culmination of our trip and a chance for us to commemorate the lives, the service and the sacrifice of the Australians we have been learning about for the past days. It also gives the students an oppurtunity to contribute to this national commemoration. The dawn was mild again this year and only needed the sleeping bag for comfort not warmth. It is a long day but rewarding and especially for the students and an experience and memory that will last a lifetime. Rachel played a special part in the ceremony today;

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Friday 26 April 2013 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
ANZAC Connections, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2012

Today was an opportunity for us to have a shorter day in preparation for the ANZAC day activities. We spent the day looking at other parts of the peninsula, making our way down to Suvla and spending more time talking about the Turkish experience. Looking at the experience of the Turkish and the conditions that the Turkish faced is an important way to provide a balance to the tour. It is always a challenge on this day because do security changes, road closures and dignitaries so we always have to play it by ear a little. Bryce reflected on today;

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Thursday 25 April 2013 by Stuart Baines. 1 comments.
ANZAC Connections, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2012

Today is an interesting day for the kids. we spend sometime exploring further but the spend the afternoon rehearsing for ANZAC Day. The department of Veterans Affairs is generous enough to provide a role for the student for the activities before the dawn service and then at the Lone Pine service later in the day. It is an amazing opportunity for them. We started the day with a cruise that gives the perspective of what the Australians would seen when they landed at the beaches. We drifted of ANZAC cove and the formidable obstacle of the terrain is never more apparent.

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Tuesday 23 April 2013 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
ANZAC Connections, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2012

Today we visited the ancient city of Troy for a taste of ancient history and a change of pace. We never truly detach from the Gallipoli campaign and even on our way to and from Troy we were able to talk about the naval campaign. There is no better way to understand the difficulties and the enormity of the task that lay ahead of the French and British navies than to stand at the Dardanos Battery and look down at the straits and the narrows. The afternoon was a chance for us to look at the role of the French and British at the landings and to visit the French cemetery at Cape Helles.

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Tuesday 23 April 2013 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
ANZAC Connections, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2012

Today was an opportunity for us to walk the frontline. We had made an attempt to follow the ridge up from Shrapnel Valley cemetery but the wet in Turkey this year has been unusual and we were sunk at our first creek crossing or maybe more accurately bogged. This is one of the most intense days for the students with lots of information about the campaign and plenty of walking. For those of you who have been here before or have time to look at a map, we walked from Lone Pine to Baby 700 and then from Chunuk Bair down Rhododendron Ridge to Embarkation Pier.

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