Thursday 24 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 24 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

There are only five known Aboriginal servicemen buried at Gallipoli, however, it is estimated that 500-800 Aboriginal diggers served in the First World War. Ethnicity was not recorded in the enlistment process and research into indigenous service can involve trawling across many different sources, sometimes we may never know who these servicemen were.

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Wednesday 23 April 2008 by Andrew Gray. 5 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Simpson Prize Winners

Day 1

Stepping on two continents

It's great to see that the concept of quiet Sunday morning traffic exists in other places around the world. Leaving Istanbul was quick and simple, even though we got an idea of just how big a city of 16 million people can be. A drive through green countryside was very pleasant, noting the complete lack of fences and many shepherds with sheep and goats. The boy from Kingaroy has seen plenty of tractors in his time in Australia, but out in the paddocks, not cruising down the road like they do here.

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Wednesday 23 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

The first action by the Allies against the Ottomans began as a naval operation and occurred here on the Dardanelles. On the 18 March a large British and French fleet of 18 war ships advanced towards the Narrows, hoping to put the forts that defended the Dardanelles out of action, threaten Constantinople and open supply routes to Russia.The war operation began with preliminary bombardments of the Turkish forts in January and February 1915. The operation failed due to the impenetrable defences of this passage which included artillery and mines that were laid strategically in the narrows.

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Wednesday 23 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 1 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

On the journey from Istanbul to the Dardanelles the Battlefield tour noticed this striking memorial on the slopes of the Kilitbahir Plateau. In English it translates to:

Stop passerby

The ground you tread on, unawares,

Once witnessed the end of a generation.

Listen in this quiet earth

Beats the heart of a nation.

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Sunday 20 April 2008 by Andrew Gray. 6 comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Simpson Prize Winners

If we were sensible and thoughtful students, we would talk about the rich cultural experience we had today visiting the Blue Mosque, Topaki Palace, Basilica Cistern and Hagia Sophia. We would describe the centuries old Christian and Muslim history associated with these places, reflecting on the significant events and people that are part of Turkish history.

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Saturday 19 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. 1 comments.
Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

The tour has been visiting some of the famous sites of the old city including the Hippodrome, Haghia Sophia and the Blue Mosque. These grand and glorious monuments tell us much of Istanbul's long history. This city is the former capital of three successive empires Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman.

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Saturday 19 April 2008 by Andrew Gray. No comments.
Battlefield Tours Simpson Prize Winners

Merhaba - after a marathon plane flight we made it. Istanbul is awesome – huge, fast- paced, chaotic and full of people. A cruise on the Bosphorus was a great way to experience the city from the relative calm of our boat. We saw many palaces and mosques, and noted that nearly everything has a Turkish flag. Amazing houses right on the water, just like the OC but older and more expensive. We also cruised Istiklal St, just down from the hotel, and managed to avoid getting run over by trams, cars, bikes and pedestrians – quite an achievement.

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Thursday 17 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

It turns out that Rod Stewart, one of our fellow travellers on the tour, is also a fellow blogger. Rod's grandfather Edward John Howells served at Gallipoli where he was evacuated injured.

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Wednesday 16 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

Reaching Constantinople (present day Istanbul) was the objective of the Dardanelles campaign in 1915. An objective that failed. The battlefield tour, however, managed to arrive safely at Istanbul airport in high spirits and only slightly crumpled from the long flight. We checked into the Marmara hotel to ‘freshen up' and in the afternoon we set off to cruise on the Bosphorus followed by a visit to the Egyptian Spice Market.

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Tuesday 15 April 2008 by Robyn Van Dyk. No comments.
News, Battlefield Tours Gallipoli

Those of us travelling with the Memorial on the Gallipoli battlefield tour arrived in Istanbul today following a long journey from our various home ports. On a flight of over 22 hours it is inevitable that conversations would be struck and I met several Australians also travelling to Gallipoli. For the first leg of the trip I sat next to an Australian Vietnam war veteran. He was planning on touring the battlefields and to attend the Dawn Service at Gallipoli.

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