Thursday 31 July 2014 by Dianne Rutherford. 11 comments.
Collection, Military Heraldry and Technology First World War uniforms, badges

This is one of a series of blogs about First World War uniforms and covers the basic aspects of badges seen on Australian Imperial Force uniforms. It does not cover unofficial unit badges, or qualification or proficiency badges. These may be covered at a later date.

Read on

In this WW1 themed sound reel four Australian men voice their experiences of the Imperial Camel Corps.

Read on

eX de Medici's "Australia, special forces (everywhere, current), Aust flag 2010", depicts a Special Forces cutaway helmet in its current colour scheme. ART94355

Read on

Many people tend to associate embroidery and needlework with women and the comfort of the homefront, but men are also known to pick up the needle and thread, especially it seems during times of war.  Whether stitched as a way to pass the time in a prisoner of war camp, to record events, places and names, or as rehabilitation therapy in military hospitals, embroidered items have many interesting stories to share.  To celebrate World Embroidery Day, 30 July, here are some examples of First World War rehabilitation embroidery from the Memorial’s National Collection, and stories of th

Read on

Tuesday 29 July 2014 by Ashleigh Wadman. 2 comments.
Collection, Military Heraldry and Technology First World War uniforms

This is one in a series of blogs that covers the basic aspects of Australian uniforms during the First World War. There is a great diversity between nursing uniforms of the First World War. This variety is due to the fact that nursing uniforms were not centrally manufactured or issued in this war. Instead, nurses were given a uniform allowance to equip themselves and were allowed to make their own uniforms if they chose. This, and tailoring variations within Australia and overseas, led to considerable variety in the uniforms as can be seen in contemporary photographs.

Read on

By August 1944 there were 2,223 Japanese prisoners of war in Australia. Of these 1,104 were housed in Camp B of No. 12 Prisoner of War Compound near Cowra, in the central west of New South Wales.

The Italian, Japanese, Taiwanese and Korean prisoners of war interned at Cowra were treated in accordance with the Geneva Conventions. But relations between the Japanese prisoners of war and their guards from the 22nd Garrison Battalion were poor, due largely to significant cultural differences.

Read on

Wednesday 23 July 2014 by Ashleigh Wadman. 3 comments.
Collection, Military Heraldry and Technology

The National Collection is rich with material and stories relating to wartime propaganda. When thinking about this it is only natural to recall the graphic printed pamphlets and posters depicting strong emotionally charged messages eliciting support for the war and suspicion of the enemy. One vehicle for propaganda which is perhaps less well known is that of the medallion.

Read on

Thursday 17 July 2014 by Dianne Rutherford. 8 comments.
Collection, Military Heraldry and Technology First World War uniforms

This is the third in a series of blogs about First World War uniforms and covers the basic aspects of the Australian Imperial Force headwear during the First World War.

Read on

The end of armed conflict in the European theatre of the Second World War in May 1945 saw tens of thousands of western Allied Prisoners of War from all over the world be repatriated to the United Kingdom for their first steps in their eventual return to their families and friends. 

Read on

Pages