• 'The Woman Who Threw Japs'

    Friday 11 April 2014 by Lucy Robertson. 5 comments

    The embroidered Lunghwa tablecloth which depicts a map of the internment camp, surrounded by approximately 800 signatures.

    The embroidered Lunghwa tablecloth which depicts a map of the internment camp, surrounded by approximately 800 signatures. RELAWM32380 On a slow news day in Perth in 1950, an article appeared in The Daily News with the eye-catching title of ‘The Woman Who Threw Japs’. The Daily News reported of a Russian woman who had tackled and ‘thrown’ three Japanese prison …

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  • Australia's link to Colditz

    Monday 17 February 2014 by Tamsin Hong. 8 comments

    Colditz Castle was used as a prisoner of war camp for Allied prisoners who had attempted to escape from their German captors during the Second World War. The castle has captured popular imagination through the film The Colditz Story (1955) based on P.R. Reids book of the same name.

    Colditz Castle was used as a prisoner of war camp for Allied prisoners who had attempted to escape from their German captors during the Second World War. The castle has captured popular imagination through the film The Colditz Story (1955) based on P.R. Reids book of the same name. P01608.012 Unknown to their captors, eight prisoners were huddled in a small office, waiting …

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  • ‘Good fearless soldiers’: two brothers at Pozières, 1916

    Tuesday 4 February 2014 by Craig Tibbitts. 7 comments

    An Australian soldier among the scattered battlefield graves at Pozieres. Some 23,000 Australians became casualties in this fighting, of which 7,000 died

    This article was originally published in Inside History Magazine, Issue 20, Jan - Feb 2014. Find out more and subscribe to Inside History here. An Australian soldier among the scattered battlefield graves at Pozieres. Some 23,000 Australians became casualties in this fighting, of which 7,000 died E00998 In 1927 the Australian War Memorial’s Director, John Treloar, wrote …

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  • Sound Online #3 – Lucky Escapes of the First World War

    Monday 3 February 2014 by Gabrielle Considine.

    The Australian War Memorial has remarkable hidden stories in its sound collection. This compilation of interview extracts reveals the lucky escapes of five men that served during the First World War. These men suffered wounds, sickness and witnessed the horrific casualties of war. They describe themselves to be the lucky ones. These oral history interviews have been digitally preserved as part of the sound preservation program at the …

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  • ANZAC voices - relics from Pheasant Wood

    Friday 10 January 2014 by Dianne Rutherford. 2 comments

    The ANZAC voices exhibition features a number of rare documents displayed for the first time, such as some of Frederick Tubb’s diaries and John Simpson Kirkpatrick’s letters. It is also the first time the Memorial has displayed relics recovered from the Pheasant Wood mass grave at Fromelles. They are a combination of personal and military issued items. Five of the six items are associated with unidentified remains, the sixth item, a …

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  • Christmas in Cairo 1914 - Private John Simpson, 3rd Field Ambulance

    Thursday 19 December 2013 by Robyn van Dyk.

    I would not have joined this contingent if I had known that they were not going to England. Private John Simpson, 3rd Field Ambulance, Christmas Day 1914 When the Australians of the First Contingent were sent to Egypt for training in 1914 many were interested to see the exotic and ancient sights. During this period of training the men had some free time where they could visit Cairo, climb a pyramid, bet on horse races or buy beer, …

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  • Remembered. The Dernancourt Cross

    Tuesday 17 December 2013 by Paul Taylor. 3 comments

    It isthe spring of 1918 andthe greatGerman offensive, Operation Michael, is driving westward. The morning of 5 April is misty with poor visibilty. At 6:55am, the men of the 12th and 13th Brigades of the 4th Division are in their forward positions along the railwayembankment as the German artillery barrage starts to fall. Behind the Australians is a long rising bare slope at the top of which is the Amiens – Albert road. In front of …

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  • A New Tradition: The ADF in Mardi Gras 2013

    Tuesday 17 December 2013 by Vick Gwyn. 9 comments

    In December 2012, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) announced that for the very first time, ADF members would be allowed to march in uniform at Sydney’s Mardi Gras parade in 2013. This momentous announcement coincided with the ADF’s 20th anniversary of the removal of the ban on homosexuals serving in the armed forces. The march would also fall on the 35th anniversary of the parade, making the inaugural uniformed march all the more …

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  • Film Collection Online: Father Christmas Joins Up!

    Monday 16 December 2013 by Daniel Eisenberg.

    To celebrate the holiday season, the Film/Sound section of the Australian War Memorial have put together this light hearted Christmas video as our final showreel for the year. Drawing on material from across various conflicts from both home and abroad and items in both our film and sound collections, our video highlights the joy that Christmas brings to young and old. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from the team in Film/Sound! …

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  • ANZAC voices - Improvisation at Gallipoli

    Thursday 12 December 2013 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

    Two soldiers sit beside a pile of empty tins cutting up barbed wire for jam tin bombs.

    Some of the objects on display in the new ANZAC voices exhibition illustrate the ingenuity of the ANZACs when faced with insufficient supplies and equipment at Gallipoli. When the ANZACs landed there on 25 April 1915, they expected a quick advance to Constantinople [Istanbul] so did not carry the equipment or supplies they needed for trench warfare. Although supplies were brought in throughout the campaign by boat, these could be delayed…

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