Emma Jones previously mentioned in 60 year old sweat on a wedding dress – a conservation challenge the preparation of Miss Platt-Hepworth’s wedding dress for the exhibition Of Love and War. The decision was made by the curator Rebecca Britt to keep the staining as evidence of use.

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Isn’t it funny how things come about? While working on the textiles component for the exhibition Of Love and War a painted kitbag came to me for treatment. The lovely pin-up painted on the bag looked an awful lot like Dorothy Lamour, a beautiful actress known as the “Sarong Girl” in the 1940’s.  As the exhibition will be travelling I had to chuckle that Dorothy Lamour made a string of Bing Crosby/ Bob Hope “On the Road” films. The kitbag belonged to Signaller John Conrad Lynam, a timber cutter from Brisbane.

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Thursday 19 November 2009 by Sarah Clayton. 3 comments.
Conservation, Of love and war Conservation, Of Love and War, wedding dress, Wedding Dresses, preservation, Textile

Once we determined that the remaining three wedding dresses, requested for the exhibtion Of Love and War, were able to be safely put on display, the textile conservators worked in collaboration with curators and exhibition staff to determine the dimensions of showcase and, the types and styles of mannequins.

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Thursday 12 November 2009 by Emma Jones. 7 comments.
Conservation, Of love and war Exhibition, Conservation, Love and war, Of Love and War

Back in September, I was doing some work out at our Treloar Annex, which is where our conservators work.  I was videoing the construction process of the mannequins being made for the 3 wedding dresses  that are to be included in the “Of love and war” exhibition. During a break in filming I got talking to Jessie Firth, who was working on one of the wedding dresses .  She was applying fake perspiration to material to see what effect it would have.

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 As previously explained four wedding dresses were initially selected for "Of Love and War". One of the wedding dresses, originally owned by Mrs N S Bissaker, required hundreds of hours of painstaking work before it would be strong enough for display, so unfortunately it will not be ready for display in “Of Love and War”.  Instead this dress with go on our Vulnerable Textiles conservation list and be conserved with all the care it deserves to preserve it for the future.

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Thursday 29 October 2009 by Emma Jones. 2 comments.
Exhibitions, Conservation Exhibition, Conservation, Love and war, wedding dress

Here is the first of several blog posts about the wedding dreses being considered and conserved for our upcoming Of love and war exhibition.

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Wednesday 1 April 2009 by Laura Kennedy. 3 comments.
Collection, Conservation

The sponson on the left hand side of the Mark IV tank was removed last year for inclusion in the Memorial’s exhibition, “1918, Advancing to Victory”.

The tank was relocated to the Memorial’s Large Technology Workshop in order to safely remove the sponson.  This provided an excellent opportunity for Conservation to undertake a preservation treatment of the tank which would include a full repaint, back to it’s original colour scheme.

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Thursday 17 April 2008 by Andrew Pearce. 2 comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, Collection, Conservation Aircraft Conservation

Upon removal of the fabric from the upper mainplane it was discovered that an extensive number of the ribs were damaged.

Shattered ribs in upper mainplane. Note timber reinforcing panels nailed to rib faces.

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Friday 11 April 2008 by Andrew Pearce. 6 comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, Collection, Conservation Aircraft Conservation

The Memorial has been able to gain access to substantial amounts of the original fabric, which was removed from the Albatros during the 1960's restoration with the exception of the rudder and the ailerons. Significant analysis of this material has been carried out in order to determine the correct details for fabric colours, panel widths and orientations, seam widths, rib stitching and the dimensions of rib tapes.Photographic evidence shows the starboard aileron to have been covered in lozenge on both upper and lower surfaces.

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