• Linking Australian history to the English curriculum

    Thursday 18 June 2015 by Kathleen Cusack.

    Driver, the silky terrier.

    Driver, the silky terrier. A02639 “Nothing smells the same over here. I can no longer smell the pungent eucalypt trees. I can’t hear the screaming echoes of the white cockatoos that soar through smudgeless blue skies.” The wonderful thing about the Memorial’s collection is that it can be used as inspiration for lessons right across the curriculum, not just history. …

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  • Olivia’s Anzac Day

    Tuesday 28 April 2015 by Kathleen Cusack. 1 comments

    Anzac Day, 1943

    Anzac Day, 1943 138745 It was the crowds that bothered Olivia the most. Every Anzac Day ceremony the strangers swelled around her with somber faces. And last year it rained. This year Olivia was expected to endure the early morning freeze at the Memorial’s Dawn Service. Every year her parents insisted that she mark this day for a grandfather she hardly remembered. Her …

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  • Exploding like clockwork

    Wednesday 8 April 2015 by Stephanie Boyle. 3 comments

    E00383 It isalways interestingto look atphotographs from WW1besideimages from Afghanistan,butthis casesuggests the truth ofthe old saying, "some things never change". The WW1 photographabove was taken following the retreat ofGerman forcesfromthe French village they so recently occupied.In keeping witha practice typical of the time, explosive booby traps were oftenrigged for unwary allied …

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  • Memorial Box Banter - Part VII

    Tuesday 27 January 2015 by Kathleen Cusack.

    Albert and Norman Holden

    On the day that the Armistice was signed, whilst shouts of rejoicing could be heard in every direction, I stood alone with a lump in my throat, feeling in no mood to wave flags, though deeply grateful that hostilities had ceased and that no more precious human lives would have to be sacrificed.* A few weeks after the First World War ended, Gladesville resident, Dora Boulton, opened her mail to read these words from Victorian chaplain, …

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  • Collection Detection answer #15

    Thursday 11 December 2014 by John Holloway.

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: It is a torpedo siren whistle. When blown, a pair of internal steel rotors spin to produce a low, rising siren sound, which would alert sailors to the imminent threat of any torpedo spotted approaching their ship. Torpedos—underwater missiles propelled by compressed air—were capable of crippling or sinking even …

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  • Collection Detection #15

    Wednesday 3 December 2014 by John Holloway. 2 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #15 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

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  • Collection Detection answer #14

    Wednesday 19 November 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: The first of Chudleigh's two wartime concertinas: a Lachenal 20-key Anglo. It is a concertina, which belonged to Australian soldier Herbert Chudleigh during the First World War. He enlisted in August 1914, at 22 years of age. Two months later the accountant from Liverpool Road in Ashfield, Sydney, left Australia, and…

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  • Collection Detection #14

    Friday 14 November 2014 by John Holloway. 3 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #14 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

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  • Dig Deeper - The first convoy

    Friday 31 October 2014 by John Holloway. 2 comments

    Charles Bryant, First convoy at sea, 1920, oil on canvas, 122.5 cm x 275.3 cm, AWM ART00190 Australia’s involvement in the Great War led to many "firsts" – but few as fateful as the day the very first convoy of Australian and New Zealand troops left Albany, in Western Australia, for a journey into the most devastating conflict in Australia’s history. It was exactly 100 years ago tomorrow – 1 November 1914. A century on, the …

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  • What have we learned? - The Australian experience of war and the Australian Curriculum

    Wednesday 22 October 2014 by Stuart Baines. 2 comments

    Military history plays an important part in defining chapters in the history of individual nations. Its impacts reach into most aspects of life and experience not only during the time of conflict but also before and after the event. Isolating the period of conflict from the social or political history has the potential to become an orchard in which the fruit of myth grows ripe. Some argue that in the context of Australia’s experience …

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