• Memorial Box Banter - Part VI

    Friday 17 October 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Concerned about the new curriculum? We can help! Exploring primary and secondary sources in the classroom can seem like a daunting prospect but the new Australian curriculum provides an exciting opportunity for students to put their hands on history. The University of New England’s School of Education recently borrowed a First World War Memorial Box to show their Bachelor of Education (Primary) students how to use the items…

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  • Collection Detection answer #13

    Tuesday 14 October 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: It is a trench periscope. Trenches were defensive positions dug to provide cover from enemy fire, and so exposing your head and eyes above the edge was a risky business. This was particularly true at Gallipoli where the enemy trenches could be as little as twenty yards away. At the same time, however, observation of the…

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  • Collection Detection answer #12

    Monday 15 September 2014 by John Holloway.

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: It is a personal strobe light and distress beacon. Able to flash a bright light to attract attention, they were used by Australians during the Vietnam War for many purposes. One was the guiding of medical evacuation helicopters flying at night to the site of the wounded. This particular example belonged to Leading …

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  • Collection Detection #12

    Friday 5 September 2014 by John Holloway. 5 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #12 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

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  • Dig Deeper - Recruitment standards

    Wednesday 20 August 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    How would you measure up? With the outbreak of war in August 1914, Australia began an official recruiting effort to raise an army to send overseas. However, the Australian Imperial Force (AIF), as it was named, would not take just anyone. It was intended to be a force of skilled, experienced soldiers, chosen from “the fittest, strongest, and most ardent in the land”.1 Recruits being medical examined at Victoria Barracks. With …

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  • The messages - Commemorative Crosses Project

    Wednesday 6 August 2014 by Jayne Simpson.

    Children writing messages on Commemorative Crosses

    “Your spirit astounds us Your bravery inspires us Your courage awes us Your sacrifice strengthens us...” These words are inscribed by an Australian school aged child upon a simple wooden cross to be laid at a war grave of a fallen Australian serviceperson. Messages of hope and thanks have been written on thousands of crosses that have been placed on the graves where Australian Servicemen and women are buried. These include …

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  • Collection Detection answer #11

    Tuesday 29 July 2014 by John Holloway.

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: Front view of the mobile shield. REL/12494 It is a mobile shield or “one man tank”, behind which allied soldiers on the Western Front could creep forward while protected by bulletproof steel. By 1914, advances in technology had revolutionised warfare, with new weapons such as the machine gun giving defenders a vital…

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  • Collection Detection #11

    Thursday 24 July 2014 by John Holloway.

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #11 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

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  • Collection Detection answer #10

    Monday 30 June 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: Baron Manfred von Richthofen. They are wing fragments souvenired from the aircraft of Baron Manfred von Richthofen – the “Red Baron” who was shot down and killed on 21 April 1918. Perhaps the most famous fighter pilot of all time, Richthofen had just claimed his last combat victory (he was officially credited with…

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  • Collection Detection #10

    Friday 20 June 2014 by John Holloway. 2 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is - or what it came from - in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #10 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

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