• Collection Detection answer #9

    Thursday 22 May 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for this week. As promised, here is the answer: It is a German flechette dart – a sharpened projectile weapon which Australian soldier William Howie found lodged in a case of ration biscuits while in the trenches at Gallipoli. A lethal shower of these darts had just been dropped over Victoria Gully by an enemy aircraft. Early in the First World War, huge numbers of flechettes were …

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  • Memorial Box Banter - Part V

    Thursday 8 May 2014 by Kathleen Cusack. 2 comments

    Nearly a century has passed since the First World War began. It has been almost seventy five years since the Second World War and over fifty years since the arrival of Australian troops in Vietnam. It is little wonder that it can be challenging for students today to understand the contribution Australians have made in wartime. Memorial Boxes are consistently booked out each year in the weeks leading up to Anzac Day as schools search for…

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  • Collection Detection #9

    Tuesday 6 May 2014 by John Holloway. 4 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #9 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

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  • Anzac Day - Simpson Prize 2014

    Saturday 26 April 2014 by Stuart Baines.

    Lack of sleep and the enormity of the day yesterday has prevented the blog going up earlier. It is always a unique experience when taking a bunch of teenagers to an event like this. Each year they critically examine their experience and all bring their own perspective. Commemoration is powerful but it also resonates in different ways for people. I am always fascinated to see how our Simpson Prize winners react, and even more so the …

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  • Experiencing the peninsula - Simpson Prize 2014

    Thursday 24 April 2014 by Stuart Baines.

    Today is a day where we try to experience the peninsula as much as we can the way the soldiers did. Cruising the waters off the Anzac area of operations gives the students a perspective of where the major actions of the campaign happened and maybe a sense of what the men saw as they rowed ashore. Walking the front line, a little surprise for the students that will give them a taste of how these men lived, and then on to a walk through …

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  • From Troy to Helles - Simpson Prize 2014

    Wednesday 23 April 2014 by Stuart Baines.

    After a long day looking at the campaign, today was an opportunity for us to look further into Ottoman history and look beyond the Australian perspective. It is important to remember that the Gallipoli campaign was not an Australian campaign and that the ANZAC commitment was just one part of a broader allied force. The British and French commitment particularly was far greater in number than that of the Australians and New Zealanders. I …

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  • Collection Detection answer #8

    Wednesday 23 April 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for this week. As promised, here is the answer: It is a wooden sign, which reads “English burying place”, made from a section of packing case. It was found by Australian Ernest Peacock at Gallipoli in 1918, just after the war. The Allies had once again landed on the Gallipoli peninsula – this time in peace – where they would occupy the forts of the Dardanelles they had never …

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  • Walking the Frontline - Simpson Prize 2014

    Tuesday 22 April 2014 by Stuart Baines.

    Today is always one of biggest days of the trip, it is the day where we walk the line and see the central area from Lone Pine to the Nek. The purpose of the day is to try and help the students understand what it was like, how these Anzac's experienced this brutal campaign. It can be tough physically and tough emotionally and so I was not surprised at how drained we all were on our return. We had a particularly poignant moment at the end …

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  • To queue or not to queue - Simpson Prize 2014

    Monday 21 April 2014 by Stuart Baines.

    Today has been a day of contrasts. This morning we walked down one of the major boulevards in the old city, down towards the Hippodrome and beside the Blue Mosque and Haigia Sophia. A beautiful pink and orange sky accompanied us as well as our usual pack of local dogs. With the exception of our little band the streets were virtually empty, the only consistent presence was the Turkish street sweepers that we came across every 100 or so …

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  • Our first day at Anzac Cove - Simpson Prize 2014

    Monday 21 April 2014 by Stuart Baines.

    Today is always my favourite day of the trip. It is the day that I get to be part of the students' and teachers' first taste of the Gallipoli peninsula. It always reminds me of my first steps here and the enormous and profound effect it had on me. Until that time I had focused my studies on the later action on the Western Front. I never understood why a sideshow campaign with comparatively small losses could be so etched into our …

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