• “From your dead soldier son”: the conscription referenda 1916–17

    Monday 25 November 2013 by Dianne Rutherford.

    This article was originally published in ICON Magazine, Issue One November - December 2013. Find our more and suscribe to ICON Magazine here. THE POLLING BOOTH ON THE CONSCRIPTION REFERENDUM J02466 The Australian War Memorial is currently redeveloping its First World War galleries in anticipation of the centenary from 2014. During this period, the Memorial is staging an exhibition, called ANZAC voices, which tells the story of the …

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  • ANZAC Voices - new exhibition

    Monday 25 November 2013 by Robyn van Dyk.

    ANZAC Voices, the Memorial’s new First World War exhibition, is currently being installed. The exhibition will open this Friday, 29 November 2013 and represents a rare opportunity to view original accounts of the First World War - letters to a sweetheart; a diary account of a hard-fought battle; postcards scrawled in the trenches and battlefields of war. Everybody’s story is unique – so the challenge in curating ANZAC Voices has …

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  • Knitting for the troops

    Friday 25 October 2013 by Jessie Webb. 3 comments

    It can be difficult to get an idea of what was happening on the home front just by looking at military records. What were the people who weren’t serving doing? How did they feel? What did they do to play their part in Australia’s war effort? One thing many Australians did during both the First and Second World Wars was knit. Australia-wide, local organisations, schools, church groups, knitting circles, and individuals banded …

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  • 'Men who had been in Hell'

    Monday 23 September 2013 by David Gist. 7 comments

    The glass-plate negatives from Vignacourt are significant because they offer insights into the reality of life on the Western Front. There are photos that show the laughter and the mateship among these soldiers, and the general feeling of life away from the line. Like any true portrait, many offer an insight into the character and mood of the subject. None of the soldiers in this post have been identified, but photographs created so …

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  • Memorial prepares to commemorate First World War Centenary

    Monday 16 April 2012 by Dennis Stockman. 2 comments

    Prime Minister Gillard announces funding support for the First World War Galleries The Australian War Memorial will mark the Centenary of the First World War through a vibrant four year cultural program including changing our First World War galleries.  Sign up to e-Memorial for updates and follow how our planning is progressing. Refurbishment of the First World War galleries at the Australian War Memorial Prime …

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  • Medals of a Rat

    Wednesday 31 August 2011 by David Gist. 4 comments

    Visitors to the Memorial’s exhibition Rats of Tobruk 1941 will have noticed the unofficial Rats of Tobruk medal presented, according to its engraving, by Lord Haw Haw. Around twenty of these medals were made at Tobruk, which illustrates one of the earliest examples of the town’s defenders reclaiming the title ‘Rat’, bestowed on them by the propaganda radio program ‘Germany Calling’. Visitors may also notice the brasso caked …

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  • Four weeks, two hospitals and one hair-raising adventure!

    Tuesday 19 April 2011 by Robyn Siers. 2 comments

    Question: What’s the definition of “tough”? Answer: Australian service nurses In early April 1941, the nurses and physiotherapists of 2/5th and 2/6th Australian General Hospitals (AGH), were transported to Greece with the men of the 6th Division. They were moved around frequently, often at short notice, as the Germans advanced down the Greek peninsula. Hospital supplies and food were in short supply, and many of the incoming …

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  • The War on Malaria

    Friday 27 August 2010 by Cherie Prosser. 1 comments

    There were grave fears for the strength of Australians fighting in the malaria prone regions of the Pacific during the Second World War. By June 1943, it was estimated 25,000 Australians in Papua and New Guinea had contracted malaria. Supplies of quinine, used to treat malaria since the First World War, and the synthetic drug atebrin were inadequate to meet demand. The Land Headquarters Medical Research Unit was quickly established in …

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  • 1941 anniversary exhibition

    Friday 18 June 2010 by Karl James. 6 comments

      1941 was a year of battle. It was a time of victories and defeat. Australian soldiers, sailors, and airmen fought their first major battles of the Second World War in North Africa and in the Mediterranean. Australian and British troops won a series of early successes in Libya and later in Syria. But they also suffered greatly on mainland Greece and on Crete. When a rapid German offensive swept the British from Libya, all that …

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  • "Dorothy" the Kitbag

    Friday 11 December 2009 by Bridie Kirkpatrick. 3 comments

    Isn’t it funny how things come about? While working on the textiles component for the exhibition Of Love and War a painted kitbag came to me for treatment. The lovely pin-up painted on the bag looked an awful lot like Dorothy Lamour, a beautiful actress known as the “Sarong Girl” in the 1940’s.  As the exhibition will be travelling I had to chuckle that Dorothy Lamour made a string of Bing Crosby/ Bob Hope “On the Road” …

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