Friday 27 August 2010 by Cherie Prosser. 1 comments.
Exhibitions Malaria, Nora Heysen

There were grave fears for the strength of Australians fighting in the malaria prone regions of the Pacific during the Second World War. By June 1943, it was estimated 25,000 Australians in Papua and New Guinea had contracted malaria. Supplies of quinine, used to treat malaria since the First World War, and the synthetic drug atebrin were inadequate to meet demand. The Land Headquarters Medical Research Unit was quickly established in Cairns, Queensland where a specialist team of researchers trialled synthetic anti-malarial drugs.

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Friday 18 June 2010 by Karl James. 6 comments.
Exhibitions, 1941, Tobruk Tobruk, 1941, North Africa

 

1941 was a year of battle. It was a time of victories and defeat. Australian soldiers, sailors, and airmen fought their first major battles of the Second World War in North Africa and in the Mediterranean. Australian and British troops won a series of early successes in Libya and later in Syria. But they also suffered greatly on mainland Greece and on Crete. When a rapid German offensive swept the British from Libya, all that stopped the Germans from continuing into Egypt was the defiant garrison at Tobruk.

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Isn’t it funny how things come about? While working on the textiles component for the exhibition Of Love and War a painted kitbag came to me for treatment. The lovely pin-up painted on the bag looked an awful lot like Dorothy Lamour, a beautiful actress known as the “Sarong Girl” in the 1940’s.  As the exhibition will be travelling I had to chuckle that Dorothy Lamour made a string of Bing Crosby/ Bob Hope “On the Road” films. The kitbag belonged to Signaller John Conrad Lynam, a timber cutter from Brisbane.

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 As previously explained four wedding dresses were initially selected for "Of Love and War". One of the wedding dresses, originally owned by Mrs N S Bissaker, required hundreds of hours of painstaking work before it would be strong enough for display, so unfortunately it will not be ready for display in “Of Love and War”.  Instead this dress with go on our Vulnerable Textiles conservation list and be conserved with all the care it deserves to preserve it for the future.

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Thursday 29 October 2009 by Emma Jones. 2 comments.
Exhibitions, Conservation Exhibition, Conservation, Love and war, wedding dress

Here is the first of several blog posts about the wedding dreses being considered and conserved for our upcoming Of love and war exhibition.

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Thursday 22 October 2009 by Emma Jones. No comments.
Exhibitions Exhibition, Flickr

On December 3, 2009, the Australian War Memorial will be opening its exhibition “Of love and war”.  

The impact of war on romantic relationships and the ways in which Australians incorporated affairs of the heart into their wartime lives  is a powerful subject and we would like the public to contribute their stories via our Flickr group.

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Thursday 10 September 2009 by Nicholas Schmidt. 3 comments.
News, Collection, Exhibitions Of Love and War

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Those who regularly read the AWM blog might remember the Valentine’s Day blog post about a mysterious love letter from a young French woman to her soldier sweetheart.

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Friday 13 February 2009 by Nicholas Schmidt. 13 comments.
News, Collection, Exhibitions Private Records, Valentine's Day, Of Love and War

The Memorial recently acquired a mysterious letter. It is beautifully written and decorated, but we don't know much about it. It seems it was written by a French woman to her sweetheart, and we assume he was Australian, as the letter ended up in Australia. We do not know who they were, but we do know that the letter was written on 25 August 1918 and was sent from Saint-Sulpice-les-Feuilles in France. The writer, Martha (or perhaps Marthe) Gylbert, obviously missed her soldier, and went to a great deal of trouble to decorate the letter.

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Thursday 18 September 2008 by Dianne Rutherford. 8 comments.
News, Exhibitions Technology

An example of an observation post disguised as a tree. This one was used by Australian troops during the Battle of Messines on 7 June 1917 at Hill 63.
 

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Tuesday 19 August 2008 by Amanda Rebbeck. 23 comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, News, Exhibitions

A new permanent exhibition, Over the Front: the Great War in the air, will open on 28 November 2008 at the eastern end of ANZAC Hall. The story of military flight and aerial combat during the First World War will be brought to life through the Memorial’s collection of five original and extraordinary aircraft and an exciting sound-and-light show.

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