Wednesday 10 September 2014 by David Heness. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection, Personal Stories

On 6 August 1914, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War, Australia agreed to a request by the British government to seize German wireless stations in the south-west Pacific, namely German New Guinea. Australia was also required to occupy the territory under the British flag and establish a military administration. For the first time, Britain called upon Australia to train, supply and command her own forces in defence of the empire. Consequently, the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) was born.

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Wednesday 27 August 2014 by Aaron Pegram. 5 comments.
First World War Centenary, Opinion, views and commentary, Wartime

Among the first casulties of the First World War were Australians fighting in the British Army.

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Tuesday 26 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 7 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections

“…it is simply rotten here in the bad weather up to our knees in mud and water and no chance of getting dry …”

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Monday 18 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 14 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Family history, Personal Stories

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

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Wednesday 6 August 2014 by Jayne Simpson. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, First World War Centenary, News Commemorative Crosses

Children writing messages on Commemorative Crosses

“Your spirit astounds us
Your bravery inspires us
Your courage awes us
Your sacrifice strengthens us...”

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Many people tend to associate embroidery and needlework with women and the comfort of the homefront, but men are also known to pick up the needle and thread, especially it seems during times of war.  Whether stitched as a way to pass the time in a prisoner of war camp, to record events, places and names, or as rehabilitation therapy in military hospitals, embroidered items have many interesting stories to share.  To celebrate World Embroidery Day, 30 July, here are some examples of First World War rehabilitation embroidery from the Memorial’s National Collection, and stories of th

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Thursday 26 June 2014 by Robyn van Dyk. 5 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection

General John Monash is considered one of the war’s outstanding commanders. Monash was an avid collector, and his papers held at the Memorial give a comprehensive view of his wartime military career: from his command of the 4th Australian Brigade on Gallipoli to the Australian Corps in 1918, and then his role as Director General of Demobilisation and Repatriation of the AIF at war’s end.

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