Friday 10 October 2014 by David Heness. 18 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection, Personal Stories

Private James Charles Martin was in a bad state. Exhausted and suffering from a high fever, he lay aboard the hospital ship Glenart Castle under the watchful eye of Matron Frances Hope Logie Reddoch. Jim was nearly fifteen thousand kilometres from his family in Hawthorn, Victoria. He had lost over half his weight serving in the squalor of the trenches at Gallipoli and had contracted typhoid fever. Soldiers often contracted the disease in the unsanitary conditions of the trenches. Then again, most soldiers were not fourteen years old.

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This month’s sound reel depicts Lawrence of Arabia in a light not usually seen.  It contains the sometimes frank opinions of four Australian contemporaries of Lieutenant Colonel T E Lawrence CB DSO.

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Friday 12 September 2014 by Theresa Cronk. 6 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection, News, Personal Stories

Today marks an important event in the annals of the Australian War Memorial’s centenary digitisation project, Anzac Connections. 50 000 pages have now been scanned for online access by all Australians and international researchers. This milestone comes as we celebrate the release of another thirty-eight personal collections to supplement the 153 collections already available online.

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Wednesday 10 September 2014 by Michael Kelly. 1 comments.
First World War Centenary, Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories, Wartime ANMEF

At the battle of Bitapaka, the ANMEF were the first Australians in combat.

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Wednesday 10 September 2014 by David Heness. No comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Collection, Personal Stories

On 6 August 1914, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War, Australia agreed to a request by the British government to seize German wireless stations in the south-west Pacific, namely German New Guinea. Australia was also required to occupy the territory under the British flag and establish a military administration. For the first time, Britain called upon Australia to train, supply and command her own forces in defence of the empire. Consequently, the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) was born.

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Wednesday 27 August 2014 by Aaron Pegram. 5 comments.
First World War Centenary, Opinion, views and commentary, Wartime

Among the first casulties of the First World War were Australians fighting in the British Army.

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Tuesday 26 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 7 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections

“…it is simply rotten here in the bad weather up to our knees in mud and water and no chance of getting dry …”

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Monday 18 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 14 comments.
First World War Centenary, Anzac Connections, Family history, Personal Stories

The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s collections as well as provide full copies for research on the Memorial’s website.

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