• Work continues on the FWW dioramas!

    Friday 17 October 2014 by Alana Treasure. 6 comments

    Somme Winter

    Our apologies that it has been a while since our last FWW Dioramas conservation posting - it'sbeen a big year!! Along with continued cleaning and repairs, some of the tasks and activities we've been spending our time on this year are moulding and casting missing weapons, repairing broken weapons and re-joining the previously cut pieces of diorama bases requiring filling and inpainting. The Semakh diorama has been returned to display in …

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  • Fourteen.

    Friday 10 October 2014 by David Heness. 18 comments

    Studio portrait of 1553 Private (Pte) James (Jim) Martin, 1st Reinforcements, 21st Battalion, of Hawthorn, Vic.

    Private James Charles Martin was in a bad state. Exhausted and suffering from a high fever, he lay aboard the hospital ship Glenart Castle under the watchful eye of Matron Frances Hope Logie Reddoch. Jim was nearly fifteen thousand kilometres from his family in Hawthorn, Victoria. He had lost over half his weight serving in the squalor of the trenches at Gallipoli and had contracted typhoid fever. Soldiers often contracted the disease in…

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  • Preserving Sister Lummer’s Ward Dress Part 1- History

    Friday 26 September 2014 by Eleni Holloway. 3 comments

    Sister Lummer’s dress has two buttons on the bodice, and evenly spread gathers at the waistband, rather than pleats. The thick gathers at the shoulders, back and waste band allowed the necessary free movement.  RELAWM14065.001

    Sister Lummer’s dress has two buttons on the bodice, and evenly spread gathers at the waistband, rather than pleats. The thick gathers at the shoulders, back and waste band allowed the necessary free movement. RELAWM14065.001 Sister Rosalie Agnes Lummer was a distinguished nurse of the First World War. Born at Riverton, South Australia, she enlisted with the AIF on 27 July 1915, aged 29, and embarked for Bombay, India, in August …

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  • Opinions of Lawrence

    Wednesday 24 September 2014 by Gabrielle Considine. 1 comments

    This month’s sound reel depicts Lawrence of Arabia in a light not usually seen. It contains the sometimes frank opinions of four Australian contemporaries of Lieutenant Colonel T E Lawrence CB DSO. Lieutenant Colonel Lawrence, also known as Lawrence of Arabia, was a British Army advisor to the Hejaz Army in Jordan and Saudi Arabia. In this sound reel is a significant recording from the Memorial’s collection, that of a speech by …

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  • Anzac Connections: 50 000 pages and counting!

    Monday 15 September 2014 by Theresa Cronk. 6 comments

     Batch 6

    Today marks an important event in the annals of the Australian War Memorial’s centenary digitisation project, Anzac Connections. 50 000 pages have now been scanned for online access by all Australians and international researchers. This milestone comes as we celebrate the release of another thirty-eight personal collections to supplement the 153 collections already available online. Each of these collections provides a fascinating …

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  • First to fight

    Wednesday 10 September 2014 by Michael Kelly. 1 comments

    The Bitapaka road. The first objective of the New Guinea expedition was the German wireless station at Bitapaka, a few miles inland from Blanche Bay, which at the outbreak of war was still in the course of construction, but was hurriedly finished and ready for use.

    At the battle of Bitapaka, the ANMEF were the first Australians in combat. The Bitapaka road. The first objective of the New Guinea expedition was the German wireless station at Bitapaka, a few miles inland from Blanche Bay, which at the outbreak of war was still in the course of construction, but was hurriedly finished and ready for use. A03146 The two scouts pushed into …

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  • A hundred years on: the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF)

    Wednesday 10 September 2014 by David Heness.

    On 6 August 1914, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War, Australia agreed to a request by the British government to seize German wireless stations in the south-west Pacific, namely German New Guinea. Australia was also required to occupy the territory under the British flag and establish a military administration. For the first time, Britain called upon Australia to train, supply and command her own forces in defence of the …

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  • Yarns – a new Memorial knitting publication

    Tuesday 2 September 2014 by Ashleigh Wadman. 13 comments

    Miss Coll knitting socks directly from a sheeps fleece in Melbourne, Victoria. The Australian Comforts Fund then packed the completed socks into bales - as seen to her left - and shipped them overseas to Australian troops.

    Miss Coll knitting socks directly from a sheeps fleece in Melbourne, Victoria. The Australian Comforts Fund then packed the completed socks into bales - as seen to her left - and shipped them overseas to Australian troops. H02438 The Memorial is seeking to publish Yarns: First World War Stories and Patterns from the Australian War Memorial’s Knitted Collections in April …

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  • The first to fall

    Wednesday 27 August 2014 by Aaron Pegram. 5 comments

    Chisholm

    Among the first casulties of the First World War were Australians fighting in the British Army. On 26 August 1914, two weeks before the first action undertaken by Australian troops in the First World War, a 22-year-old lieutenant of the 1st Battalion East Lancashire Regiment lay mortally wounded by shrapnel in a cornfield outside the village of Ligny-en-Cambrésis. He had been in France for just three days. British and French troops had …

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  • Inside the Anzac Connections project

    Tuesday 26 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 7 comments

    “…it is simply rotten here in the bad weather up to our knees in mud and water and no chance of getting dry …” The man who endured these conditions, Private John Collingwood Angus, 28th Battalion, was writing to his sister Nance, from France in May 1916. By 6 July he was killed but the letters he wrote were donated to the Australian War Memorial and his words now reverberate through time because of modern technology. My name is…

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