Monday 21 April 2014 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2014, News

Today is always my favourite day of the trip. It is the day that I get to be part of the students  and teachers first taste of the Gallipoli peninsula. It always reminds me of my first steps here and the enormous and profound effect it had on me. Until that time I had focused my studies on the later action on the Western Front. I never understood why a sideshow campaign with comparatively small losses could be so etched into our collective consciousness. Since that time I have always looked for ways that I can share the importance of this experience.

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Monday 21 April 2014 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2014, News

Today has been a day of contrasts. This morning we walked down one of the major boulevards in the old city, down towards the Hippodrome and beside the Blue Mosque and Haigia Sophia.  A beautiful pink and orange sky accompanied us as well as our usual pack of local dogs. With the exception of our little band the streets were virtually empty, the only consistent presence was the Turkish street sweepers that we came across every 100 or so metres. We returned to where we walked after breakfast to start our days activities and we encountered a sea of tourists.

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Saturday 19 April 2014 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, Battlefield Tours, Simpson Prize 2014, News

Day two of this experience and we were lucky enough  to visit some of the most amazing sites of Isatanbul. One in particular, Chora Church Museum gives a particularly interesting window into the layered history of this city. The more time we spend looking into this city and its treasures the more I hope we can start painting a picture of the Turkish people for the students. These are a people with a much longer and in some respects, more complicated history than white Australia and it makes all the more interesting the shared experience of the men at Gallipoli. 

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Friday 18 April 2014 by Stuart Baines. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, Simpson Prize 2014, News

For over a decade the Australian War Memorial has supported the Simpson Prize, the premier history based essay writing competition for Australian school students. In the 2014 centenary, the Simpson Prize has once again inspired students across the nation, and eight lucky winners, one from each state and territory, have today touched down in Istanbul for the start of their tour of Turkey and the Gallipoli battlefields. I have the honour of leading the group again this year and being their battlefield guide.
 

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Thursday 17 April 2014 by Kerry Neale. No comments.
Collection Highlights, News

What link does the Australian War Memorial have to George Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett? 

 In the Memorial’s National Collection is a Second World War medal group belonging to Aeneas John Lindsay McDonnell, born at Toowoomba, Queensland, in 1904. He enlisted for military service in Brisbane in May 1944.  McDonnell had already served overseas with the Red Cross in Africa and the Middle East from April 1940 until November 1943, and enlisted with the AIF at the rank of lieutenant.

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Tuesday 15 April 2014 by John Holloway. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, News

What is it?

Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments. (Hint: It was found at Shrapnel Gully, Gallipoli, in 1918.)

We will post the answer and the full story next week! 

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Monday 14 April 2014 by Emma Campbell. No comments.
News

The often criticised role of Australian forces during the final 12 months of the Second World War will be examined at an international conference of leading historians and academics being held on the 70th anniversary of the period.

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.. We’ve had seven contacts, and 29 cache finds in the last three to four months.. we’ve killed three insurgents.. so it’s a quite active area.

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Tuesday 8 April 2014 by Emma Campbell. No comments.
News, Wartime

Tuesday 1 April 2014 by John Holloway. No comments.
Education at the Memorial, News

Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for this week. As promised, here is the answer:

It is a button hook – a popular and necessary item between the 1890s and 1920s, used to pull buttons through buttonholes. They were particularly useful when the garment or footwear was tough and unyielding. 

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