Wednesday 31 August 2011 by David Gist. 4 comments.
News, Personal Stories, Collection, Exhibitions, 1941, Tobruk Exhibition, Second World War, Rats of Tobruk

Visitors to the Memorial’s exhibition Rats of Tobruk 1941 will have noticed the unofficial Rats of Tobruk medal presented, according to its engraving, by Lord Haw Haw. Around twenty of these medals were made at Tobruk, which illustrates one of the earliest examples of the town’s defenders reclaiming the title ‘Rat’, bestowed on them by the propaganda radio program ‘Germany Calling’. Visitors may also notice the brasso caked around the small copper rat on this medal, the result of many years of cleaning.

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Tuesday 16 August 2011 by Dennis Stockman. No comments.
News

Friday 5 August 2011 by Emma Campbell. No comments.
News 8 Battalion, 57/60 Battalion, Bougainville, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, atomic bomb

The announcement of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Japan brought an uplift of spirit among personnel. The end of the war, hitherto a nebulous source of conjecture, suddenly became a definite possibility within a matter of days, even hours. Crowds imbued with eager anticipation mustered round the unit’s radio sets for each news session and gasped with amazement as statistical information about the potentialities of the bomb were unfolded. [57th/60th Australian Infantry Battalion war diary, 8 August 1945]

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Tuesday 19 July 2011 by Emma Campbell. 4 comments.
News

 

It has become known as Australia’s blackest night.

On 19 July 1916, the troops of the 5th Australian and 61st British Divisions attacked a strong German position, at the centre of which stood the Sugar Loaf salient, near the small French village of Fromelles. The overnight assault – the first major battle fought by Australian troops on the Western Front – was mainly intended as a diversion to draw German troops away from the Somme offensive further south.

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Tuesday 12 July 2011 by Theresa Cronk. No comments.
News, Collection

On Saturday 10 July 1911, King George V gave his approval for the Commonwealth Naval Forces to become known as the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). One hundred years have now passed since this event. To celebrate the centenary of the Royal Australian Navy, the reports of proceedings for fifty RAN ships and establishments are being made available online via the Australian War Memorial's website.

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Monday 4 July 2011 by Penny Hyde. 3 comments.
News, Nurses: from Zululand to Afghanistan

While searching through the Memorial’s Research Centre collection looking for stories relating to the upcoming exhibition on nurses I came across the collection of Sister Beryl Maddock (nee Chandler), containing a typed memoir, newspaper clippings, letters and a scattering of photographs. Beryl’s story stood out to me as she was one of a small number of nurses selected to join the RAAF's newly formed Medical Air Evacuation Transport Unit in 1944.

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Friday 1 July 2011 by Emma Campbell. 4 comments.
News

In the early morning of 1 July 1916, more than 100,000 British infantrymen were ordered from their trenches in the fields and woods north of the Somme River in France, to attack the opposing German line.

Within 24 hours, the British army would suffer almost 60,000 casualties, a third of whom were killed, and record the most costly day in its history.

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Sunday 15 May 2011 by Dianne Rutherford. 5 comments.
News, Personal Stories Second World War, USS Mugford, AHS Centaur

 

Talmadge Johnson in 1940 (Photograph courtesy of L Johnson)

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Thursday 7 April 2011 by Andrew Currey. 2 comments.
News, Collection

One of the many problems trench warfare presented to soldiers in the First World War was finding out what the enemy was doing behind his lines.  The simple solution to this was height, and in a relatively short time many ways of getting men and a camera off the ground were developed.

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