• For Active Service

    Friday 14 December 2012 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

      REL46119 watch chain with badges associated with Frank Pendlebury My name is Maxwell Warren and I am a work experience student at the Memorial. One part of my work experience was to research a person and one of his belongings held by the Memorial). This person was Private Frank Pendlebury, a soldier during the First World War. HMAT Borda in 1916 PB0280 Frank was born in Newcastle, NSW in December …

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  • Lockheed Hudson - A Lot Has Happened...

    Wednesday 5 December 2012 by Jamie Croker. 2 comments

    A lot of work has been carried out on the Hudson since the last blog update.  A large number of structural components have been manufactured and fitted into the lower airframe, culminating in the trail fitment last week of the 'Tunnel Gun' position.  Work will soon move forward and concentrate on the Navigators step and forward cabin detail, folowed by construction of the Radio Operators room directly behind the pilot.  …

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  • Caged birds: Australian Flying Corps prisoners of the First World War

    Monday 19 November 2012 by Emma Campbell.

    A wrecked D.H.5 aircraft near Railway Dugout in the Ypres Sector. It had crashed whilst assisting the operations of the infantry in the attack on Passchendaele Ridge. E04590 Dogfights and daring feats define the way we remember the airmen of the First World War. Popular imagination has been captured by the aces that ducked and dived in aerial duels with the enemy, notching up “kills” and narrowly avoiding crashes to …

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  • Turning points of the Second World War

    Monday 12 November 2012 by Emma Campbell.

    Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning. -- British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, 10 November 1942  The nature and timing of the turning point of the Second World War has been debated and redefined numerous times since the end of the conflict in 1945. The Russian victory at Stalingrad in January 1943 has often been seen as the key to the eventual defeat of …

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  • One soldier - two identities

    Wednesday 3 October 2012 by Amanda Rebbeck. 10 comments

    My name is Brady Davison and I am a work experience student from St Stanislaus College, Bathurst. As part of my week at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra I researched the Next of Kin plaque commemorating the First World War service of Private John Joseph Edward Darnedt. Here is his story. Jack Darnedt's Next of kin plaque REL45890 John Joseph Edward “Jack” Darnedt was born in Collingwood, Victoria in 1899, one …

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  • "With the heel of my boot I marked the site": the story of the Long Tan Cross

    Wednesday 19 September 2012 by Emma Campbell. 4 comments

    Pipers flank the men who fought in the battle of Long Tan during the dedication ceremony. P04665.798 It’s rough, scarred and made of concrete, but the Long Tan Cross has a beauty and poignancy that transcends its rudimentary  form. Erected in memory of the 18 young men who died in one of the most intense and dramatic actions of the Vietnam War, the cross has been adopted by veterans to symbolise all Australians who …

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  • Thank you and goodbye

    Friday 31 August 2012 by Marylou Pooley. 4 comments

    Steve Gower. Photo courtesy of Silas Brown After more than 16 years as Director of the Australian War Memorial Steve Gower AO AO (Mil) retires on Friday 31 August 2012. “On behalf of the Council, staff and volunteers at the Memorial, I pay tribute to Steve for his visionary and inspirational leadership. His extraordinary talents have guided the Memorial for more than a decade and a half,” said Rear Admiral Ken …

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  • Miss Lynch's Letters

    Wednesday 22 August 2012 by Emma Campbell.

      When war was declared in August 1914, it began a period of great upheaval for the lives of Australians. The young nation of just over 4 million sent 330,000 men to foreign lands such as Turkey, Egypt, France, and Belgium with the newly formed Australian Imperial Force (AIF). Most families had at least one member – or a friend or neighbour – in the fight. These men had volunteered for war; in turn, their families and friends …

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  • 70th Anniversary of the loss of HMAS Canberra

    Thursday 9 August 2012 by Marie Kesina. 8 comments

    Today marks the 70th anniversary of the loss of HMAS Canberra. On 9th August 1942, the cruiser came to a catastrophic end in the Pacific during the Battle of Savo Island. Captain Frank Edmund Getting was in command at the time. He had a long association with the Navy. His story, and that of HMAS Canberra, was uncovered whilst scanning the Reports of Proceedings for HMAS Canberra.   Portrait of Captain Frank Edmund …

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  • Long Tan cross

    Friday 27 July 2012 by Lauren Beckman. 19 comments

    Commemorative service held on the site of the battle of Long Tan, 1969, photographed by Christopher John Bellis EKN On 18 August 1969, soldiers of 6RAR/NZ (ANZAC) erected a cross in the Long Tan rubber plantation in Phuoc Tuy province (now Ba Ria–Vung Tau province), South Vietnam.  The cross marked the site where three years earlier, on 18 August 1966, 108 soldiers of D Company, 6RAR, had fought a fierce battle against…

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