• Collection Detection answer #15

    Thursday 11 December 2014 by John Holloway.

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: It is a torpedo siren whistle. When blown, a pair of internal steel rotors spin to produce a low, rising siren sound, which would alert sailors to the imminent threat of any torpedo spotted approaching their ship. Torpedos—underwater missiles propelled by compressed air—were capable of crippling or sinking even …

    Read on

  • Collection Detection #15

    Wednesday 3 December 2014 by John Holloway. 2 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #15 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

    Read on

  • When digitisation meets the galleries

    Monday 1 December 2014 by Theresa Cronk. 2 comments

    Unobtrusively and steadily for the last three months, from its corner of the office, a sole flatbed scanner has continually issued a high pitched whirring as page after page has been placed face down on a glass plate and the “Scan Now” button selected. Nearby computers have hummed whilst catalogue records have been diligently prepared for the purpose of releasing digitised pages online. The sharing of stories and quotes contained …

    Read on

  • Changi Quilt Copyright for AWM Publication

    Monday 1 December 2014 by Eleni Holloway. 2 comments

    The Australian War Memorial is seeking copyright permission to reproduce in detail the following embroidered squares from the Australian Changi quilt for a publication. Some 400 women and children were taken prisoner after the fall of Singapore in February 1942. The Australian Changi quilt was made by women interned in Changi prison, and is made up of 66 individual squares with different designs and messages. To mark the 70th Anniversary…

    Read on

  • Collection Detection answer #14

    Wednesday 19 November 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: The first of Chudleigh's two wartime concertinas: a Lachenal 20-key Anglo. It is a concertina, which belonged to Australian soldier Herbert Chudleigh during the First World War. He enlisted in August 1914, at 22 years of age. Two months later the accountant from Liverpool Road in Ashfield, Sydney, left Australia, and…

    Read on

  • Collection Detection #14

    Friday 14 November 2014 by John Holloway. 3 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #14 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

    Read on

  • Dig Deeper - The first convoy

    Friday 31 October 2014 by John Holloway. 2 comments

    Charles Bryant, First convoy at sea, 1920, oil on canvas, 122.5 cm x 275.3 cm, AWM ART00190 Australia’s involvement in the Great War led to many "firsts" – but few as fateful as the day the very first convoy of Australian and New Zealand troops left Albany, in Western Australia, for a journey into the most devastating conflict in Australia’s history. It was exactly 100 years ago tomorrow – 1 November 1914. A century on, the …

    Read on

  • Reproducing Sister Lummer’s Ward Dress - Part 2

    Tuesday 21 October 2014 by Eleni Holloway. 2 comments

    Australian Army Nurse arrange for display with original cuffs, collar, apron and cape in the new First World War galleries. The only visible parts of the replica ward dress are the sleeves and skirt.

    Australian Army Nurse arrange for display with original cuffs, collar, apron and cape in the new First World War galleries. The only visible parts of the replica ward dress are the sleeves and skirt. In this blog I have briefly documented the steps that curators and conservators took to produce a First World War replica ward dress. This follows on from Part 1 which focused on the history of Sister Lummer’s dress, and the conservation…

    Read on

  • A different kind of heroism

    Friday 17 October 2014 by Theresa Cronk.

    This blog post was written by Anne Landais, a French student from the Ecole Nationale des Chartes (National School of Palaeography and Archival Studies), which isa university level institution that prepares students in the human and social sciences for careers in history related domains. The current priorities of the Ecole Nationale des Chartes include the development of digital technologies applied to historical research and heritage …

    Read on

  • Collection Detection answer #13

    Tuesday 14 October 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: It is a trench periscope. Trenches were defensive positions dug to provide cover from enemy fire, and so exposing your head and eyes above the edge was a risky business. This was particularly true at Gallipoli where the enemy trenches could be as little as twenty yards away. At the same time, however, observation of the…

    Read on

Pages