• Behind the scenes - Roll of Honour Soundscape Project

    Monday 4 August 2014 by Jayne Simpson. 6 comments

    Sound file for the Roll of Honour Soundscape during an editing process

    Over a very busy week in the middle of June 130 schools from all across Australia participated in the Australian War Memorials Roll of Honour Soundscape Project. This project is a part of the commemoration of the Centenary of the First World War and just one of many ways the Memorial is involving children in the commemoration. This Project was launched on 4 August with the schools recording around 6,500 of the 62,000 names that appear …

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  • Collection Detection answer #11

    Tuesday 29 July 2014 by John Holloway.

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: Front view of the mobile shield. REL/12494 It is a mobile shield or “one man tank”, behind which allied soldiers on the Western Front could creep forward while protected by bulletproof steel. By 1914, advances in technology had revolutionised warfare, with new weapons such as the machine gun giving defenders a vital…

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  • Collection Detection #11

    Thursday 24 July 2014 by John Holloway.

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #11 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

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  • The Australian War Memorial will partner with the Australian National University (ANU) in a major ARC funded research project into Borneo in the Second World War

    Monday 14 July 2014 by Robyn van Dyk. 7 comments

    In a three year ARC funded research project titled: Beyond Allied Histories: Dayak Memories of World War II in Borneo the ANU and the Memorial will provide new research into how different groups of people experienced the Second World War in Borneo. The research team combines anthropological expertise from Dr Christine Helliwell of the College of Arts and Social Sciences at ANU with curatorial expertise from Robyn van Dyk, Head of the …

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  • Collection Detection answer #10

    Monday 30 June 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for last week's Collection Detection. As promised, here is the answer: Baron Manfred von Richthofen. They are wing fragments souvenired from the aircraft of Baron Manfred von Richthofen – the “Red Baron” who was shot down and killed on 21 April 1918. Perhaps the most famous fighter pilot of all time, Richthofen had just claimed his last combat victory (he was officially credited with…

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  • Collection Detection #10

    Friday 20 June 2014 by John Holloway. 2 comments

    What is it? Examine this object and tell us what you think it is - or what it came from - in the comments section below. We will post the answer and the full story next week! This is #10 in the Education team's Collection Detection series, where we look at an unusual collection item and the story behind it. Read on

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  • First World War archives on Twitter

    Friday 13 June 2014 by Vanessa Wright.

    On June 10 the Memorial participated in a Twitter event as part of International Archives Day, organised by Ask Archivists and Follow an Archive. Archives, museums and libraries from all over the world searched their collections for archive material relating to the First World War and posted it on Twitter using the hashtag #ww1archives. You can read about how the day went on the Ask Archivists blog and read all the tweets here. …

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  • P-39 Airacobras in defence of Australia

    Friday 13 June 2014 by . 7 comments

    Probably Laverton, Vic. C. 1942. A WAAAF technical trainee takes a close look at the nose of a Bell Airacobra fighter aircraft at RAAF Station Laverton.

    When we consider the many aircraft type which defended the skies above Australia and her territories, the P-40 Kittyhawk (Warhawk in American service) immediately springs to mind. Indeed, the Kittyhawk would arguably be one of the most important fighters in service with the RAAF during the Second World War. Though many veterans who served in the Northern Territory will recall with fondness, the sound of Merlin engines over the top end …

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  • The war in Papua New Guinea did not start with Kokoda - Eagles of the Southern Sky

    Friday 6 June 2014 by . 5 comments

    For some readers, it may come as a surprise that war in Papua and New Guinea did not start with fighting on the Kokoda Trail in July of 1942. This is partly due to a plethora of books which cover this important land campaign; yet fail to fully integrate the air war into the story. An exception to that statement is Lex McAulay’s Blood Iron which made a creditable attempt to inform the reader of what was occurring in the skies above the…

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  • Collection Detection answer #9

    Thursday 22 May 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments

    Thank you to everyone who submitted their guess for this week. As promised, here is the answer: It is a German flechette dart – a sharpened projectile weapon which Australian soldier William Howie found lodged in a case of ration biscuits while in the trenches at Gallipoli. A lethal shower of these darts had just been dropped over Victoria Gully by an enemy aircraft. Early in the First World War, huge numbers of flechettes were …

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