• Simpson Prize Vietnam Day 5, 16 August 2016

    Monday 22 August 2016 by .

    Simpson Prize, Vietnam: Day 5This morning was our last morning in Mekong Delta. We all enjoyed a breakfast buffet together before checking out of the The Holiday One hotel and heading off to the floating markets. The floating markets was a 30 mins boat drive from the mainland. Once we arrived there was heaps of unique fresh local produce that looked so vibrant on the boats. Our boat circled a couple of times around the market before …

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  • Simpson Prize Vietnam, Day 2, 13 August 2016

    Thursday 18 August 2016 by .

    Simpson Prize, Vietnam: Day 2The highway north out of Saigon goes all the way to Cambodia, but today we were only going as far as Cu Chi, the sleepy rural area just north of Saigon (or Ho Chi Minh City). Throughout the VIetnam War thousands of tonnes of explosives rained down on the province from American B-52 Bombers in an attempt to deny the Viet Cong use of the strategically important area.At the southern end of the Ho Chi Minh Trail …

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  • Simpson Prize Vietnam Day 1, 12 August 2016

    Friday 12 August 2016 by .

    Simpson Prize, Vietnam: Day 1The flight from Sydney was... fuzzy. At the end of it, a six hour flight, most were exhausted, especially those of us who had flights before-hand. After a short sleep, emphasis on the third word, we were mustered into the plane for another flight. Despite the exhaustion that seemed to drag a weight on every limb and movement, the excitment and enthuasism were practically palatable.Vietnam is a well travelled …

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  • The Carnage of the Somme

    Monday 27 June 2016 by Aaron Pegram. 6 comments

    Like most Australian soldiers who fought in the First World War, Private James Makin did not fight on Gallipoli. The 22-year-old bank clerk from Middle Park in Melbourne had enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in July 1915 and left Australia with a reinforcement group for the 21st Battalion two months after the last troops were evacuated from Anzac. Makin’s war began in Egypt, where for months he tramped on pack marches and…

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  • Decoration from Destruction: the First World War Trench Art of Sapper Pearl

    Thursday 28 April 2016 by Kerry Neale.

    A dump of 18 pounder shell cases at Birr Cross Roads, in the Ypres Sector, where positions were occupied by the 2nd Divisional Artillery, during the battle of Zonnebeke, 20 September 1917, when these shells were used. Photographer: Frank Hurley.

    During the battles that raged between 1914 and 1918, millions of shells were blasted between the fighting forces, leaving the people and the ground around them mutilated. This was a new type of war, yet there was an unexpected by-product of these used shell cases: trench art. A dump of 18 pounder shell cases at Birr Cross Roads, in the Ypres Sector, where positions were occupied by the 2nd …

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  • A ‘fine body of men’: the Kurrajongs recruitment march, January 1916

    Thursday 21 January 2016 by Kerry Neale. 3 comments

    Kurrajong banner - http://harrowercollection.com

    Recruitment Marches The outbreak of the First World War brought an immediate rush of volunteers wanting to serve their country. In 1915, in the central west of New South Wales, a movement began which became known as the 'Gilgandra snowball'. Under the leadership of 'Captain Bill' Hitchen, 20 or so men who had decided to enlist started off to march to Sydney. Gathering other recruits along the way, they numbered about 300 by the time …

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  • Good Friday, 1915

    Thursday 2 April 2015 by Alison Wishart. 2 comments

    Soldiers and civilians outside a burnt out building in Esbekiah Street, Cairo. April 1915.

    One hundred years ago, in 1915, Good Friday fell on 2 April. While their families were going to church and preparing fish dinners, the Anzacs stationed in training camps near Cairo, Egypt, went on a rampage. The 'Battle of Wazza' took place in Cairo's red light district. Parts of Derb el Wasa and Haret el Wasser(known affectionately as 'The Wozzer', Wassir, Wasser, Wassar etc.) were gutted.…

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  • Vale Peter Anthony Ward

    Wednesday 18 March 2015 by David Gist. 13 comments

    Yesterday afternoon, Peter Ward passed away after a long illness. Peter is best known for his work as an official army photographer, both film and still, in Vietnam from 1969 to 1970. The Photographs, Film and Sound Section of the Australian War Memorial offer a small sample of his work from the National Collection. WAR/70/0018/VN During this period of the centenary of Anzac, it is easy …

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  • 2015 Australian Summer Scholars Presentations

    Wednesday 18 February 2015 by Lachlan Grant. 2 comments

    Wallace Anderson and Louis McCubbin, Lone Pine (1924–27)(detail).  AWM AR PAIU2011/184.10

    Public Talk: 2015 Australian Summer Scholars Presentations Thursday 19 February, 2 pm – 3.30 pm BAE Systems Theatre Australian War Memorial Presentations for the 2015 Australian War Memorial Summer Vacation Scholarship Scheme will take place on Thursday 19 February in the BAE Systems Theatre at the Australian War Memorial, 2 pm – 3.30 pm. This year the three presentations feature Mr Shaun Mawdsley (Massey University) on the creation …

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  • In deep respect - Bede Tongs OAM MM

    Wednesday 28 January 2015 by Garth O'Connell. 6 comments

    Captain Bede Tongs (centre) with his wife and his brother Reginald after being presented his Military Medal by the Governor-General in Canberra, July 1947. Reginald was captured in Singapore with the 2/20th Battalion AIF and along with tens of thousands of others suffered under Japanese captivity on the Burma-Thai death railway and at Changi until his release in 1945.

    Yesterday at the Christ Church in Queanbeyan NSW the funeral of a local community stalwart, Bede Tongs OAM MMwas conducted. Amongst the many mourners inside andoutside the Churchwere several current and ex-members of staff and senior management of the Australian War Memorial including yours truly. It is tremendously hard to put into so few words what a positiveimpact Bede had not just on me personally and professionally, but on my …

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