Wednesday 27 August 2014 by Aaron Pegram. 5 comments.
First World War Centenary, Opinion, views and commentary, Wartime

Among the first casulties of the First World War were Australians fighting in the British Army.

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Many people tend to associate embroidery and needlework with women and the comfort of the homefront, but men are also known to pick up the needle and thread, especially it seems during times of war.  Whether stitched as a way to pass the time in a prisoner of war camp, to record events, places and names, or as rehabilitation therapy in military hospitals, embroidered items have many interesting stories to share.  To celebrate World Embroidery Day, 30 July, here are some examples of First World War rehabilitation embroidery from the Memorial’s National Collection, and stories of th

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When we consider the many aircraft type which defended the skies above Australia and her territories, the P-40 Kittyhawk (Warhawk in American service) immediately springs to mind.  Indeed, the Kittyhawk would arguably be one of the most important fighters in service with the RAAF during the Second World War.  Though many veterans who served in the Northern Territory will recall with fondness, the sound of Merlin engines over the top end with the arrival of No.

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Thursday 1 May 2014 by . No comments.
Art, Collection, Collection Highlights, News, Opinion, views and commentary

In November 2013 the Memorial purchased 13 First World War (FWW) posters at the auction of the Dr Hans Sachs collection in New York. As part of my research into the collector Dr Hans Sachs (1882-1974) I discovered that, his passion for the graphic arts led to a German U-boat becoming an unlikely exhibition venue for posters at the height of the First World War.

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.. We’ve had seven contacts, and 29 cache finds in the last three to four months.. we’ve killed three insurgents.. so it’s a quite active area.

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Monday 7 April 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories Dubai, AMAB, Sister Beauty salon

Day 29: homecoming rituals

Today was our final day in the MEAO (Middle East Area of Operations) - tomorrow we start the trek home on a chartered A340.

One of the homecoming rituals is sorting through your kit and cleaning off the dust of Afghanistan. The laundry whirs as people wash and scrub everything so that it will pass the quarantine inspection. Some boots are too down-trodden to be taken home.

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Monday 7 April 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories dessert, PTSD, AMAB

Day 28: Decompression

My room mate said to me at 9pm last night: "I feel like I should be doing something, that I should be working! I'm all fidgety and I can't sit still". She keeps checking her right hip for her pistol and her left hip for her military ID that she had to carry at all times on base. She has just returned to AMAB (Al Minhad Air Base) after spending six busy months working on logistics in Kabul. She worked 12 hour days that were punctuated by eating, sleeping and going to the gym. This is not "normal" life!

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Monday 7 April 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories AMAB, Dubai, airfields, mothering

Day 27: Under her wings

Our one hour flight from Bahrain to Dubai turned into an 11 hour endurance test. After spending most of the night in the air waiting for a freak cyclone to ease and in the Bahrain transit lounge, we finally made it back to AMAB (Al Minhad Air Base) safely.

Rain is rare in the Middle East, but it has rained in every place we have visited. We seem to be taking it with us. I wonder if it will be raining in Canberra when we finally get home.

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Thursday 3 April 2014 by Alison Wishart. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary, Personal Stories Bahrain, forts, battle watch, surveillance

Day 26 - Battle watch

We had a few spare hours before our flight departed Bahrain today, so G3 and I went to an old fort.  I was particularly pleased to get away from our accommodation, as I felt like I was under house-arrest. Not being able to leave the house without a male escort was stifling (see day 24).

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