• Les Wasley: Capturing Vietnam

    Monday 8 December 2014 by Gabrielle Considine. 1 comments

    “You can’t convey, as I call it, the fear of the unknown”, Les Wasley 1928 - 2014 In this showreel Leslie Martin Wasley describes what it was like to be camera man in a war zone. Inducted into the Cinematographers Hall of Fame in 2013, he was renowned for his evacuation footage shot in war torn Vietnam in April 1975, at the fall of Saigon. Parts of oral interviews, held in the Memorials collection, with Les Wasley and Journalist …

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  • ANZAC voices : The Pflaum brothers

    Friday 21 November 2014 by Dianne Rutherford. 3 comments

    ANZAC voices : The Pozieres and Fromelles display case, featuring the Pflaum story The temporary exhibition, ANZAC voices is only open for one more week. It contains a number of interesting stories, including that of Ray and Theo Pflaum who served on the Western Front. Theo Pflaum P09521.001 Ray Pflaum P09291.453…

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  • Brothers: the story of Alec and Goldy Raws

    Thursday 20 November 2014 by David Heness. 4 comments

    How does a son tell a father whom they love that they’re about to leave them, possibly forever? How does a father persuade a son not to leave, a son they have watched grow into a fine young man, a son they have nurtured and loved from the moment their boy opened his eyes, a son who they watched as he learnt to walk and now watched again as those same legs prepared to march him to war? The Raws family. As John Alexander …

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  • White’s Turkish Odyssey

    Thursday 13 November 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey.

    “One Arab, whom I mistaken at a distance for a soldier in blue uniform, proved to be a naked fanatical savage…” Captain Thomas Walter White, sitting second from the left, July 1915, Basra. Captain Thomas Walter White, Australian Flying Corps, had just landed, damaging his aircraft in the desert close to the ancient city of Baghdad. His observer, Captain Francis Yeats-Brown, Royal Flying Corps, jumped out to blow the telegraph …

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  • A Last Letter from Gallipoli

    Wednesday 12 November 2014 by Melissa Cadden.

    “I build castles in the air every day about our reunion.” Private Thomas Anderson Whyte, letter to Eileen Wallace Champion, AWM Private Records collection (PR04722). Circular silver frame with velvet backing, the front face of the frame has a decorative pattern running the entire circumference of frame. Displayed inside the frame is a black and white photo of Thomas Anderson Whyte smoking a pipe, dressed in blazer. A blue velvet …

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  • A sombre duty.

    Wednesday 5 November 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 1 comments

    Graves Registration Detachment, Australian section, of the Imperial War Graves Unit

    “We will be a hard headed crowd when we get back, after the sights we see…” This is a line from a letter written by Henry George Whiting, who volunteered for the grisly but vitally important task of exhuming dead allied soldiers, identifying them and reburying them into organised cemeteries. Whiting was born on 27 March 1889 at Adelong, New South Wales, one of eighteen children born to James and Annie Elizabeth Whiting (née …

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  • "He taught us all how to die..."

    Monday 3 November 2014 by David Heness. 1 comments

    Douglas Barrett-Lennard and the Western Australians of the 8th Australian Field Artillery Battery Of such mettle were the men who, under the most insuperable difficulties of Anzac, fought their guns throughout the campaign. C. E. W. Bean in The Official History of Australia in the War of 1914-1918: Volume II, The Story of Anzac: from 4 May, 1915 to the Evacuation When Charles Bean, Australia’s official First World War historian, …

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  • A different kind of heroism

    Friday 17 October 2014 by Theresa Cronk.

    This blog post was written by Anne Landais, a French student from the Ecole Nationale des Chartes (National School of Palaeography and Archival Studies), which isa university level institution that prepares students in the human and social sciences for careers in history related domains. The current priorities of the Ecole Nationale des Chartes include the development of digital technologies applied to historical research and heritage …

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  • Fourteen.

    Friday 10 October 2014 by David Heness. 18 comments

    Studio portrait of 1553 Private (Pte) James (Jim) Martin, 1st Reinforcements, 21st Battalion, of Hawthorn, Vic.

    Private James Charles Martin was in a bad state. Exhausted and suffering from a high fever, he lay aboard the hospital ship Glenart Castle under the watchful eye of Matron Frances Hope Logie Reddoch. Jim was nearly fifteen thousand kilometres from his family in Hawthorn, Victoria. He had lost over half his weight serving in the squalor of the trenches at Gallipoli and had contracted typhoid fever. Soldiers often contracted the disease in…

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  • Below the surface of Naval Reports of Proceedings

    Wednesday 8 October 2014 by Meagan Nihill. 2 comments

    “On Saturday, 1 September, I was accorded the privilege of giving away the Bride at the marriage between Miss Caroline Elizabeth Edwards and ABUC Gordon Stephen Dempsey…A small wedding reception was held, after the ceremony, in my cabin.” This anecdote appears as Paragraph 10 of the Report of Proceedings for HMAS Stuart in August 1968. Surrounded by perfunctory remarks on the ship’s movements, training regimes, and the health …

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