• ANZAC Connections: Centenary digitisation project

    Monday 18 August 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 14 comments

    The Australian War Memorial is currently undertaking a project to create a comprehensive digital archive of the ANZACs and their deeds, and of the wider Australian experience of war. The collections are selected from our extensive archives and reflect the experiences of Australian servicemen, nurses and civilians during the First World War, not just well-known personalities. This project will digitally preserve the Memorial’s …

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  • SS Warilda: troopship, hospital ship, ambulance transport, wreck

    Friday 1 August 2014 by Jennifer Milward. 8 comments

    Warilda in camouflage paint added in 1917 after Germany stated all vessels operating in the English Channel would be attacked.

    In August 1915, the SS Warilda was requisitioned by the Commonwealth and fitted out as a transport ship. HMAT Warilda made two trips to Egypt and one to England, carrying more than 7,000 troops. Following the Warilda’s conversion to a hospital ship in July 1916, she spent a few months stationed in the Mediterranean, before being put to work transporting patients across the English Channel. Between late 1916 and August 1918 she made …

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  • The Imperial Camel Corps

    Thursday 31 July 2014 by Gabrielle Considine. 3 comments

    In this WW1 themed sound reel four Australian men voice their experiences of the Imperial Camel Corps. After Australian troops withdrew from Gallipoli in December 1915, the Ottoman Empire persuaded the pro-Turkish Senussi tribesmen to attack British-occupied Egypt. In January 1916, a Desert Mounted Corps was formed to deal with the revolt. The Imperial Camel Corps formed four battalions: the 1st Battalion was entirely Australian, the …

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  • Captured in paint - a 69 year old mystery solved.

    Monday 7 July 2014 by Garth O'Connell. 22 comments

    Reception desk at Gowrie House, Eastbourne by Australian Official War Artist Stella Bowen.

    The end of armed conflictin the European theatre of the Second World War in May 1945 sawtens of thousands of western Allied Prisoners of War from all over the worldbe repatriated to the United Kingdom for their first steps in their eventualreturn to their families and friends. Among them were several thousand Australians, who in the course of the war in North Africa and Europe,found themselvesin German or Italian run prisoner of war …

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  • An Australian in Normandy 1944

    Saturday 28 June 2014 by Daniel McGlinchey. 3 comments

    In the Norman countryside raged a tank battle. The air was filled with noise, explosions, screeching tracks, collapsing buildings and the smell of cordite. Captain Leslie George Coleman had been in a building on the first floor directing radio traffic between the battalion and brigade HQs. Later moving from his position, a projectile hit the wall above Coleman and in the ensuing maelstrom he was wounded in his shoulder. He was at the tip…

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  • “Your brothers were laying there, they had been killed…”

    Friday 27 June 2014 by David Heness. 7 comments

    The Allen brothers with their family.

    Privates Stephen Charles Allen and Robert Beattie Allen were literally brothers-in-arms. The brothers from Manly in New South Wales had enlisted within a week of each other in July 1915, both with the 13th Infantry Battalion. After embarking from Australia in September of that year the brothers were first sent to Egypt for several months. Unaware of the conditions that awaited them at the Western Front they, like many others, were …

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  • The Partners Project

    Thursday 8 May 2014 by Gabrielle Considine.

    P05415.003 Recently, partners of current serving members of the ADF have shared their stories with the Australian War Memorial as part of the Partner’s Project. Through oral history interviews, this project explores the everyday lives of people who support their military partner. Many partners have discussed the highs and lows of postings and deployment, and the impact these have had on…

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  • "I sprang to my feet in one jump..."

    Thursday 17 April 2014 by David Heness. 4 comments

    Private Cecil Anthony McAnulty was barely able to stand. Exhausted from the intense fighting of the previous two days, he used a brief period of respite to pen his experiences of the past few days to paper. Cecil had written in his diary every day since he had left Australia. When he had completely filled his first diary he begana second, writing onwhatever scraps of paper he could find and often using the backs of envelopes sent from …

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  • Anzac Connections

    Wednesday 16 April 2014 by Robyn van Dyk. 2 comments

    Bringing historic documents from the Australian War Memorial’s archive to all Australians The first 150 collections of private records related to individuals who served in the First World War are now online and hold a wealth of stories. In the centenary year of the First World War, the Memorial has launched one of its major commemorative projects to make available the rare historic personal records of Australians who served. ANZAC …

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  • Patrol Bases of Uruzgan

    Friday 11 April 2014 by Stephanie Boyle.

    .. We’ve had seven contacts, and 29 cache finds in the last three to four months.. we’ve killed three insurgents.. so it’s a quite active area. In 2011, the Memorial's official cinematographer John Martinkus travelled from Australia’s base in Tarin Kot, Afghanistan, to Patrol Base Samad, a small and simply constructed outpost where Australian troops train and mentor Afghan National Army members, and Patrol Base MirwaisSet the …

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