• ANZAC voices: Living Conditions in the Middle East

    Wednesday 26 March 2014 by Dianne Rutherford.

    Watering horses from a canvas trough, 1918.

    When rest of the AIF went to France in 1916, the bulk of the mounted forces remained behind in Egypt. Some men, feeling they were missing out on ‘the action’, left the Light Horse and joined the infantry serving on the Western Front. Those that remained continued fighting the Turkish Army, who threatened the Suez Canal in Egypt. After 1916 the threat to the canal was over and the British and Commonwealth forces gradually advanced …

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 15

    Monday 24 March 2014 by Alison Wishart.

    Day 15 - Hurry up and wait Like parents who get their children's names muddled up, the three blokes I am travelling with often get each other's names confused. So now they are called G1, G2 and G3, and collectively, the G-force. I am known as 'Dead eye dick", because I shot 13 out of 13 rounds on target with the pistol.However, the enemy would probaby be on top of me before I managed to line up the shot and pull the trigger. As someone …

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 14

    Monday 24 March 2014 by Alison Wishart. 2 comments

    Day 14 - "an army marches on its stomach" Napoleon Bonepartewas spot on when he (is credited to have) said:"an army marches on its stomach", I haven't noticed a lot of marching going on around the base, but there's certainly a lot of eating! The food at the Aussie mess in Tarin Kotis excellent. There is fresh fruit and saladsat every meal - I tasted okra for the first time and pounced on the mangosteens(an exotic fruit even in Asia where…

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 13

    Monday 24 March 2014 by Alison Wishart.

    Day 13: colours of the battle zone The rain has cleared leaving the sky clear of dust.This providedsome spectacular views to the distant mountains beyond the Tarin Kot base. View from the balcony of my dormitory to the green zone and the mountains Just outside the base is the township of Tarin Kot and the"green zone". This is the fertile land in the river valleys where crops grow through the summer.It sounds peaceful, but it isn't. …

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 8

    Friday 21 March 2014 by Alison Wishart.

    Day 8 - Brown bears, angry birds and plane pulls Culture is a curious thing. We create it, shape it and mould it to suit ourselves andour circumstances. The military has its own culture, which is characterised by conformity.Everyone looks the same (women have to wear their hair in a bun, men must be clean shaven, no jewellry is permitted), dresses in the same uniformand speaks the same lingo of abbreviations and acronymns strung together…

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 9

    Friday 21 March 2014 by Alison Wishart.

    Day 9 - Beefcake The military is full of gym junkies. PT (personal training) is an integral part of their daily routine. Not having to buy groceries, cook food, wash dishes, clean the house, mow the lawn, or do the laundry or any other domestic duties means you have plenty of spare time. And the commute to the gym is a three minute walk at most. I used to scoff at the blokes' desire to be buff until I tried to get up off the ground …

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 10

    Friday 21 March 2014 by Alison Wishart.

    Day 10 - Army aesthetics When I arrived at Al Minhad Air Base (AMAB), I felt like I’d landed on the moon. But Multinational Base Tarin Kowt, located in southern Afghanistan, is even more desolate and stark. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarinkot There are no soft surfaces here. The base consists of shipping containers stacked beside razor wire, metal girders and steel staircases. Accommodation is in double storey reinforced …

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 11

    Friday 21 March 2014 by Alison Wishart.

    Day 11 - compartmentalising The food is so good and plentiful at the Aussie mess, that we've divided our stomachs into compartments: we switch over to the "dessert stomach" when the main stomach is full. The CO (Commanding Officer)of 7RAR (Royal Australian Regiment), the main army unit deployed in Uruzgan at present, also uses compartments but in a much more serious way. The CO is responsible for about 460 people from 7RAR who are …

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 12

    Friday 21 March 2014 by Alison Wishart.

    Day 12 - Mud and dust and salsa It rained in Tarin Kot for 36 hours straight and all the dust turned to pale brown mud. G1 wanted to go sliding in it - there's something about the rules and regimentation of an army base that just makes you want to muck up. All I wanted was a hot bubble bath to warm myself up. There was no chance ofthis, so I went to the gym instead. I did my workout in a war zone. The soundtrack of helicopters (helos) …

    Read on

  • Deploying to the MEAO - Day 5

    Thursday 13 March 2014 by Alison Wishart.

    Day 5 - Ned Kelly would be jealous What do Ned Kelly and modern Australian soldiers have in common? Body armour! Ned fashioned his out of metal, while the scientists in the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) have spent years coming up with a sophisticated protective human shell. Like everything in the Australian Defence Force, it is commonly known by its abbreviation: MCBAS. The Modular Combat Body Armour System fits like…

    Read on

Pages