Thursday 17 April 2008 by Andrew Pearce. 2 comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, Collection, Conservation Aircraft Conservation

Upon removal of the fabric from the upper mainplane it was discovered that an extensive number of the ribs were damaged.

Shattered ribs in upper mainplane. Note timber reinforcing panels nailed to rib faces.

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Friday 11 April 2008 by Andrew Pearce. 6 comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, Collection, Conservation Aircraft Conservation

The Memorial has been able to gain access to substantial amounts of the original fabric, which was removed from the Albatros during the 1960's restoration with the exception of the rudder and the ailerons. Significant analysis of this material has been carried out in order to determine the correct details for fabric colours, panel widths and orientations, seam widths, rib stitching and the dimensions of rib tapes.Photographic evidence shows the starboard aileron to have been covered in lozenge on both upper and lower surfaces.

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Thursday 3 April 2008 by Andrew Pearce. No comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, Collection, Conservation Aircraft Conservation

Work is underway to clean and repair the fuselage of the Albatros.

During the course of the last nine decades, a significant amount of grease, dust and general grime has built up inside the fuselage of the Albatros, particularly in the engine bay.

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Thursday 3 April 2008 by Andrew Pearce. 2 comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, Collection, Conservation Aircraft Conservation

The Large Technology Conservation Section are currently working on five aircraft for the upcoming First World War exhibition "Over The Front" due to open in November 2008.

The Albatros D.Va was last restored in the mid 1960s and there are a number of areas which need attention.

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Thursday 28 February 2008 by Leigh Harris. 3 comments.
Aircraft 1914 - 1918, News Aircraft Conservation

First World War 'war birds' will have their covers restored ready for display at the Australian War Memorial tomorrow.

A special team of French vintage aircraft experts will tomorrow make the ‘last stitch’ of their conservation work on rare First World War aircraft, or ’war birds’ as the aircraft are affectionately known. The war birds are progressively being ‘clothed’ as part of the restoration process, in preparation for the upcoming exhibition, Over the Front.

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