E00383

It is always interesting to look at photographs from WW1 beside images from Afghanistan, but this case suggests the truth of the old saying, "some things never change". 

Read on

Tuesday 16 December 2014 by Stephanie Hume. 3 comments.
Collection, Collection Highlights Published Collections, Christmas, First World War

The sending of a traditional Christmas card has diminished in popularity with the advent of mobile phones, email and social media. The Australian War Memorial has a large collection of postcards and greeting cards sent to and from Australian service personnel engaged in conflicts from the South African War (1898 – 1902) to Afghanistan (2001 – present). During the First World War, a very popular design of greeting card was the woven or embroidered silk postcard.

 

Read on

Wednesday 20 August 2014 by John Holloway. 1 comments.
Education at the Memorial, News Primary source, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, First World War, ACDSEH021, ACDSEH096

How would you measure up?

With the outbreak of war in August 1914, Australia began an official recruiting effort to raise an army to send overseas. However, the Australian Imperial Force (AIF), as it was named, would not take just anyone. It was intended to be a force of skilled, experienced soldiers, chosen from “the fittest, strongest, and most ardent in the land”.1

Read on

Tuesday 5 August 2014 by Chris Goddard. 2 comments.
Collection Highlights, Military Heraldry and Technology Jewellery, Watch fobs, First World War

Engraved jewellery was frequently presented to departing and returning soldiers by local shire councils and ‘Farewell’ or ‘Welcome Home’ committees during the First World War. Also known as ‘Tribute’ jewellery, these were presented in public ceremonies or dinners and often reported in the local press.  With some diligent searching, these reports can be located by searching newspaper databases such as ‘Trove’. As the jewellery was engraved and dated, you can use this information to narrow your search.

Read on

Friday 1 August 2014 by Jennifer Milward. 8 comments.
Collection, Personal Stories Warilda, troopships, First World War

In August 1915, the SS Warilda was requisitioned by the Commonwealth and fitted out as a transport ship. HMAT Warilda made two trips to Egypt and one to England, carrying more than 7,000 troops. Following the Warilda’s conversion to a hospital ship in July 1916, she spent a few months stationed in the Mediterranean, before being put to work transporting patients across the English Channel. Between late 1916 and August 1918 she made over 180 trips from Le Havre to Southampton, carrying approximately 80,000 patients.

Read on

In this WW1 themed sound reel four Australian men voice their experiences of the Imperial Camel Corps.

Read on

This sound reel features Australian soldiers from the First World War recalling memories of recruitment and enlistment.

Read on

The Sound Collection at the Australian War Memorial consists of over 9,000 oral history interviews with individuals who served during war and peacekeeping efforts. To showcase highlights from this collection the Australian War Memorial will create Sound show reels.

Read on

Friday 9 August 2013 by Dianne Rutherford. No comments.
Opinion, views and commentary First World War, Anzac Biscuits, Baking, How To...

We all know what ANZAC biscuits are – delicious treats chock full of rolled oats and golden syrup. However, I recently found that the name “ANZAC Biscuit” was used for (at least) two other published biscuit recipes during the First World War. These biscuits do not resemble the ANZAC biscuit we know and love today. To see what these biscuits were like I did some home baking and held a taste test with some of my colleagues.

Read on

Pages