Friday 19 November 2010 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments.
Personal Stories, Collection First World War, Roll of Honour, Gallipoli, Battles

Mess tin found at Lone Pine, Gallipoli in 1919Mess tin found at Lone Pine, Gallipoli in 1919 RELAWM07799.004

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Friday 15 October 2010 by Dianne Rutherford. No comments.
Collection First World War, Technology, Gallipoli

When the Gallipoli campaign quickly bogged down into trench warfare, there were not enough periscopes available to allow Australian and New Zealand soldiers to look over the parapets at ANZAC without being shot.

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Monday 9 November 2009 by Robyn Van Dyk. 1 comments.
News, Collection First World War, Digitisation

The notebooks, diaries and folders created by Charles Bean during and after the First World War have immense historic value and are considered to be one of the most significant records created by a single Australian. The collection includes 286 volumes of diaries and historical notebooks recorded by Bean at the time and often at the front line. The diaries are firsthand accounts of the war and offer a unique perspective due to Bean’s status as official correspondent.

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Monday 9 November 2009 by Robyn Van Dyk. 4 comments.
News, Collection, Opinion, views and commentary First World War, Armistice

The notebooks and diaries of C.E.W. Bean provide valuable insight into the last days of the First World War. Bean was Australia’s sole official correspondent and he worked assiduously throughout the four years of the war recording events, often from the front line.

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The Western Front was epitomised by the brute force of men against machine and each other. Tens of thousands were lost in the maelstrom of war. In the horror, friendships were forged that endured even through death. This is the story of one such friendship...

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Thursday 19 March 2009 by Theresa Cronk. 7 comments.
Personal Stories First World War, sheet music, bands, Battalion marches

What do a concert pianist, an Indian bandmaster and an Australian militia bandmaster have in common? Each of these individuals composed a march that would eventually be adopted as the regimental march of an Australian Imperial Force infantry battalion during the First World War. Many were popular songs of the period.

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Wednesday 18 March 2009 by Sue Jamesion. 23 comments.
First World War, Private Records, People

When Leonard Walter Jackson of Neutral Bay joined the AIF on the 6th of August 1915, he must have been one of the youngest Australians ever to enlist in our military services. Using the assumed name Richard Walter Mayhew, and claiming to be an 18 year old orphan, young Leonard, who was born on 27th August 1901, was actually 13 years 11 months and 10 days old on the day he "signed up".

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As with other special occasions such as Christmas and birthdays, having to spend Valentine's Day apart from loved ones would have been sad and distressing for many serving men and women, and for those at home eagerly awaiting the safe return of their sweethearts and friends.

Fortunately, there is little that can stand in the way of love and many people overcame distance and time to send messages of love and admiration, not only for Valentine's Day, but throughout the course of wartime.

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In the Research Centre, we receive a lot of enquiries from people who want to know how and where their relatives died in the First World War. Finding out this information can be a difficult task. Quite often families know no more than that their relative died on a particular date in a particular country, and they'd like to know if we can help them narrow that down.

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