The Western Front was epitomised by the brute force of men against machine and each other. Tens of thousands were lost in the maelstrom of war. In the horror, friendships were forged that endured even through death. This is the story of one such friendship...

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Thursday 19 March 2009 by Theresa Cronk. 7 comments.
Personal Stories First World War, sheet music, bands, Battalion marches

What do a concert pianist, an Indian bandmaster and an Australian militia bandmaster have in common? Each of these individuals composed a march that would eventually be adopted as the regimental march of an Australian Imperial Force infantry battalion during the First World War. Many were popular songs of the period.

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Wednesday 18 March 2009 by Sue Jamesion. 23 comments.
First World War, Private Records, People

When Leonard Walter Jackson of Neutral Bay joined the AIF on the 6th of August 1915, he must have been one of the youngest Australians ever to enlist in our military services. Using the assumed name Richard Walter Mayhew, and claiming to be an 18 year old orphan, young Leonard, who was born on 27th August 1901, was actually 13 years 11 months and 10 days old on the day he "signed up".

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As with other special occasions such as Christmas and birthdays, having to spend Valentine's Day apart from loved ones would have been sad and distressing for many serving men and women, and for those at home eagerly awaiting the safe return of their sweethearts and friends.

Fortunately, there is little that can stand in the way of love and many people overcame distance and time to send messages of love and admiration, not only for Valentine's Day, but throughout the course of wartime.

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In the Research Centre, we receive a lot of enquiries from people who want to know how and where their relatives died in the First World War. Finding out this information can be a difficult task. Quite often families know no more than that their relative died on a particular date in a particular country, and they'd like to know if we can help them narrow that down.

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Wednesday 3 September 2008 by Annette Gaykema. 5 comments.
Collection First World War, Ephemera, How To...

Embroidered silk postcards were first made in 1900 with popularity peaking during the First World War. Cards were generally embroidered on strips of silk mesh by French women. They were then cut and mounted on postcards.

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Thursday 21 August 2008 by Ann Penhallow. No comments.
Personal Stories, Family history First World War, Official records

What does a twenty-three year old wag of a soldier say in his defence, when facing yet another court martial for going AWOL during the First World War? 

If you're Private Albert Stipek, the words come easily: "I met some friends and went away with them. I had no idea the Battalion was going to the Line. I thought it was going out for a spell".  Nevertheless, he had absented himself from the 51st Battalion for nearly two months.

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Tuesday 19 August 2008 by Ann Penhallow. 4 comments.
Collection First World War, Animals in war, Official records

This week the Research Centre received a call from a fan of Sandy, Major General Sir William Throsby Bridges' favourite charger.  November this year sees the 90th anniversary of Sandy's return to Australia, after a tour of duty which included the coast of Gallipoli, Egypt and France.  Sandy's fan wished to confirm the information the Research Centre has about this much-loved animal in preparation for a ceremony to mark the anniversary.

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Friday 8 August 2008 by . 5 comments.
Personal Stories, Collection First World War, Private Records

Studio portrait of Tom Richards in 1917 (from Gold, mud 'n' guts by Greg Growden).

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