• Anzac Christmas hampers

    Tuesday 23 December 2014 by Alison Wishart. 7 comments

    Women distribute Christmas billies to men in Cairo, Egypt, December 1915. Driver Jack (John) O. McKenzie, from the 20th Australian Army Service Corps (AASC), recalls: `Every one was delighted to get one. The one I received was from two Melbourne girls. They distributed over five thousand in our camp amp; as far as I know every soldier in Egypt got one.

    Perhaps you’ve packed, compiled or received a Christmas hamper full of goodies in the last few days. About this time 99 years ago, the Anzacs who had evacuated from Gallipoli were eagerly awaiting their Christmas hampers. Women distribute Christmas billies to men in Cairo, Egypt, December 1915. Driver Jack (John) O. McKenzie, from the 20th Australian Army Service Corps (AASC), recalls: …

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  • ANZAC voices - Improvisation at Gallipoli

    Thursday 12 December 2013 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

    Two soldiers sit beside a pile of empty tins cutting up barbed wire for jam tin bombs.

    Some of the objects on display in the new ANZAC voices exhibition illustrate the ingenuity of the ANZACs when faced with insufficient supplies and equipment at Gallipoli. When the ANZACs landed there on 25 April 1915, they expected a quick advance to Constantinople [Istanbul] so did not carry the equipment or supplies they needed for trench warfare. Although supplies were brought in throughout the campaign by boat, these could be delayed…

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  • Sound Collection Online: First World War Experiences

    Monday 11 November 2013 by Jeffrey Wray.

    The Sound Collection at the Australian War Memorial consists of over 9,000 oral history interviews with individuals who served during war and peacekeeping efforts. To showcase highlights from this collection the Australian War Memorial will create Sound show reels. This debut Sound show reel gives us insight into the lives and experiences of three men who served during the First World War. Recorded in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, these men …

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  • Aw! What rot!

    Friday 10 May 2013 by Roxanne Truesdale. 4 comments

    Hi, my name is Roxi Truesdale and for six weeks I have worked as a curatorial intern at the Australian War Memorial. During this time I have been involved with the Exhibitions team, where I have been researching all of the material that was written and drawn by soldiers for publication in The ANZAC Book. Sifting through the material originally rejected by the editor Charles Bean, one short story struck me with its stark portrayal of …

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  • Gallipoli: A ridge too far

    Monday 15 April 2013 by Emma Campbell. 1 comments

     A Ridge Too Far cover image

    The story of the landings on Gallipoli on 25 April 1915 is a familiar one to Australians, commemorated each year on the anniversary and revered as a nation-building event. Yet much of the Gallipoli campaign – and in particular the major battles that took place in August – is not understood. In a new book, a group of distinguished international historians set to challenge some of the long-held misconceptions of the campaign by …

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  • A Gallipoli Camera

    Friday 29 June 2012 by Dianne Rutherford. 5 comments

    REL/21582 the camera used by Wilfred Kent-Hughes My name is Isobel White and I am a work experience student from Alfred Deakin High. As part of my week at the War Memorial I have been asked to research an item, an old Kodak camera used in World War 1 by Wilfrid Selwyn Kent Hughes. Wilfred Kent-Hughes B01041 The camera is a Kodak Vest Pocket.  It was originally made around 1912 and it was used by the …

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  • A visit to Lone Pine Cemetery

    Tuesday 5 June 2012 by Dianne Rutherford. 4 comments

    Lone Pine Cemetery 2012 While recently at Lone Pine Cemetery, Gallipoli, I took the opportunity to visit the graves of two men, Corporal David 'Yank' McVay and Private Charles Hampson who served with D Company in the 23rd Battalion. A few years ago I researched their stories while cataloguing the metal cross plates that came from their original graves.   The original grave marker for David McVay …

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  • Hospital Tent at Rest Gully Gallipoli

    Friday 2 December 2011 by Dianne Rutherford. 2 comments

    My name's Sean Limn, and I've been doing work experience at the War Memorial for the past week. One of my tasks whilst at the Memorial was to research a collection item, a piece of an old tent found at Gallipoli in 1919. The tent piece was found at Rest Gully, and is from a hospital tent left during the evacuation in December 1915. The tent was left behind as part of the ruse  to prevent the Turks from realising that an evacuation was …

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  • ANZAC Day at Gallipoli - Simpson Prize 2011

    Monday 25 April 2011 by Stuart Baines. 3 comments

    Wreath ordeley duties Well today was the day, the pinnacle of the experience and certainly a big part of why these students entered the prize. The day started for us with a midnight wake up call. We needed to allow plenty of time to beat the traffic and certainly to get as close as we can to the service. When you consider that our hotel is the closets hotel to the dawn service and that we are only about 8 kms away, you …

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  • Going to the Front - Simpson Prize 2011

    Friday 22 April 2011 by Stuart Baines.

    looking from Plugge's to the Sphinx There was just too much to tell about today so I will try and give you all a brief rundown and some of the highlights. Today we tried to trace some of the key points on the ANZAC line. We tried to put ourselves in the shoes of those men early in the day by taking the steep climb to the top of Plugge’s Plateau. The hill is thick with dense shrubs which seem to all have sharp bits on …

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