• Stinking Farm Trench Sign

    Tuesday 6 December 2011 by Dianne Rutherford. 3 comments

    My name is Romy Turner. I am a work experience student from Canberra Girls Grammar School at the Memorial for this week. As part of my work experience I had to research an item, a trench sign, from the Memorial's collection. RELAWM06263 Trench sign to Stinking Farm The trench sign ‘To Stinking Farm Currie Ave’ was collected during the First World War by Lieutenant Colonel John Basil St. Vincent Welch, whilst he was…

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  • Hospital Tent at Rest Gully Gallipoli

    Friday 2 December 2011 by Dianne Rutherford. 2 comments

    My name's Sean Limn, and I've been doing work experience at the War Memorial for the past week. One of my tasks whilst at the Memorial was to research a collection item, a piece of an old tent found at Gallipoli in 1919. The tent piece was found at Rest Gully, and is from a hospital tent left during the evacuation in December 1915. The tent was left behind as part of the ruse  to prevent the Turks from realising that an evacuation was …

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  • 'Our Hero We're Proud of Him' : Patriotic Crochet in the First World War

    Friday 4 March 2011 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

    Filet crochet was a popular craft before and during the First World War. Women would make decorative or functional items for the home such as tray cloths, milk jug covers, tea cosies, tablecloths and cushion covers. They also made decorative items for clothing, such as crochet lace collars or cuffs. During the First World War patriotic military themes were popular. Images such as ships, flags, soldiers and medals, along with slogans …

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  • Sir John Monash's German Shoulder Strap Collection

    Tuesday 4 January 2011 by Dianne Rutherford.

      RELAWM15049.004 : Shoulder straps for 233rd Field Artillery Regiment, 37, 24 and 151 Fussartillerie (Foot Artillery) Battalions and 69th Field Artillery Regiment Among the items collected by Sir John Monash during the First World War are over 200 German shoulder straps worn by men who fought against the AIF in 1918. Single shoulder straps were routinely removed from dead or captured Germans for intelligence …

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  • These boots are made for walking... too!

    Wednesday 23 June 2010 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

    Late last year the Memorial received a pair of Second World War escape andevasion (EE)boots as part of a donation. We already held two pairs of 1943 Pattern EE bootsin the collection which were designed so that if an airman baled out or crash landed over enemy territory, he could cut away the suede upper with a concealed knife. This would turn his boots into 'civilian' style shoes to help him evade capture by the Germans. Neitherpair …

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  • Hospital Ship Centaur

    Friday 5 March 2010 by Dianne Rutherford. 5 comments

    Model of the Hospital Ship Centaur, currently on display in the Second World War gallery. The Memorial holds a small, but important, collection associated with the sinking of the Hospital Ship Centaur, whose wreck site was discovered in December 2009. Many of the survivors had little or no clothing after the ship sank. One, NX33029 Driver George McGrath, was in his underwear, which he lost when he leapt overboard …

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  • Relics of the 16th Battalion at the Bloody Angle, Gallipoli, 1919

    Wednesday 14 October 2009 by Dianne Rutherford. 7 comments

    In January 1919 tattered pieces of uniform were found lying among the bones of the men of the 16th Battalion, who were killed trying to advance at the Bloody Angle on 2 May 1915. These items were recovered by Lieutenant William Hopkin James, who headed a small party to Gallipoli for the Australian War Records Section (the precursor to the Australian War Memorial). They arrived at Gallipoli in mid December 1918, and remained there until…

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  • Dr Phoebe Chapple: The first woman doctor to win the Military Medal

    Tuesday 30 June 2009 by Craig Blanch. 15 comments

    Phoebe Chapple (1879-1967) Image courtesy of the State Library of South Australia. B 25677/34 Phoebe Chapple was always going to be someone special. She grew up in a family of high achievers. Apart from her father, Frederic Chapple, who was headmaster at Prince Alfred College Adelaide, five of her seven siblings held university degrees: Alfred a lecturer in engineering at St John’s University Cambridge; Ernest, another…

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  • These boots are made for walking...

    Tuesday 14 April 2009 by Dianne Rutherford. 9 comments

    Among the items held at the Memorial that were issued to air crew serving in Europe, are two pairs of very interesting 1943 Patternescape boots. Theboots weredesigned so that an airman downed in Europe could remove a small concealed knifeand cut off the top section of the boot to reveal a civilian looking shoe. The 1943 Pattern escape boot was designed in response to reports received from returned airmen who had baled out over …

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  • The Indefatigable Florence MacDowell

    Thursday 5 March 2009 by Dianne Rutherford. 2 comments

      Florence MacDowell in 1912 (from Private Records collection 2DRL/1138) Florence MacDowell was born in the mid 1870s, the daughter of Swanston Hay MacDowell and Kathleen Champ. She trained as a nurse at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Victoria and the Queens Hospital in Adelaide, South Australia. She opened her own hospital called ‘Windarra' at Toorak in Victoria, but later moved abroad, living mostly in Italy. She…

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