• How best to remember someone?

    Tuesday 23 December 2014 by Alison Wishart. 5 comments

    A collection compiled by Maude Edmondson and donated to the Australian War Memorial

    How best to remember someone? In the past, when someone died, some people created scrap books or dossiers as a way of working through their grief and gathering together all the memorabilia. This is what Maude Edmondson did when her son died at Tobruk in 1941, in an action for which he received a Victoria Cross. A collection compiled by Maude Edmondson after the death of her son, donated to the Australian War Memorial. How are loved ones…

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  • Slouch hat memorial at Bullecourt

    Monday 29 October 2007 by Guy Olding.

    Photo courtesy of the Department of Veterans' Affairs. A bronze slouch hat must be a unique commemorative device. A Bullecourt school teacher, Claude Durand, began to translate Charles Bean’s account of the battles, partly for his own interest, partly for the benefit of his students. He was struck by the scale of the British and Australian casualties and realised that they had no local memorial. He and the mayor Jean …

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  • Roll of Honour

    Thursday 12 April 2007 by Craig Tibbitts.

    Roll of Honour bronze panel at the Australian War Memorial Tens of thousands of British and Empire troops remain ‘missing’ in France and Belgium. The bodies of many of them were located after the war and placed in war cemeteries where they lie in nameless graves. The remains of others have never been found. The Menin Gate at Ypres records the names of 55,000 of those killed in Belgium who have no known grave and a …

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  • The Ypres lions

    Wednesday 4 April 2007 by Craig Tibbitts. 3 comments

    The Menin Gate lions at the entrance of the Australian War Memorial In medieval times two stone lions bearing the coat-of-arms of Ypres stood at the entrance to the Cloth Hall, the town’s civic and commercial centre. Centuries passed and the town’s glory faded. The lions were moved to the Menin Gate and stood there during the war while Ypres was reduced to ruins by German artillery fire. The lions, broken and …

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  • The Menin Gate Memorial

    Wednesday 4 April 2007 by Craig Tibbitts. 3 comments

    Tens of thousands of British and Empire troops remain ‘missing’ in France and Belgium. Some lie in nameless graves while the remains of others have never been found. The Menin Gate at Ypres records the names of 55,000 of the missing in Belgium and a similar number are recorded elsewhere; there are 35,000 names on the Tyne Cot memorial. The names of Australia’s 6,000 missing in Belgium are engraved on the walls of the Menin Gate.…

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