• Tobruk Diaries: Look out above!

    Monday 18 April 2011 by Carlie Walker.

    Bryant's Diary:  Friday, 18th April 1941 Today was quiet and only a little artillery was active.  We got plenty of food which is pretty good.  There was an issue of Egyptian cigarettes – a gift from King Farouk, but the boys didn’t go much on their flavour; they were too strong. Cosgriff's Diary:  Saturday 19th April 1941 Raided from 1-6 am.  Plenty of planes and plenty of 1000 bombs.  Several fell in workshops one on road and…

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Sand Storms and Air Raids

    Monday 14 March 2011 by Carlie Walker. 3 comments

    Bryant’s Diary:  Friday 14th March 1941 I had a cow of a night last night.  The wind became very strong and my eyes, ears, mouth and nose became choked with sand.  I spent all day making a dug out for myself.  It can do anything now.  As a matter of fact we had a shower of rain today, but it was only slight.  Still no more air raids. Bryant’s Diary:  Saturday 15th March 1941 Another dive-bomber came over this morning.  I let …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Planes, ships and automobiles

    Monday 7 March 2011 by Carlie Walker. 1 comments

    Bryant’s Diary: Friday 7th March 1941 The convoy spread out more today and there were only six trucks to the mile.  As a result our truck didn’t leave until about 1 o’clock.  We had a bit of a shock when a large plane flew towards the convoy.  The truck pulled up and we dived out and took cover.  The plane turned out to be British and I bet the pilot laughed.  We passed through Barce, the ex-Italian aerodome and finally camped…

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  • Tobruk Diaries: They're off: Moving on

    Monday 21 February 2011 by Carlie Walker.

    Bryant's Diary: Friday 21st February 1941 Retired back to Wadi Chariar and took up positions in old Turkish trenches.   Cosgriff's Diary: Friday 21st February 1941 Pino Defunctis [For the Dead].  Slept in to 7:15.  Used private fruit knife at breakfast.  Found Byrne Nolee a Catholic.  Photos turned out...O.K.  Sent parcel to Elsa.  Letters to her and Jas Carragher.  Tom Steele back from Nile Boat.  John and Len on getting …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Preparing to move - Reprimands, Promotions and Confessions

    Monday 14 February 2011 by Carlie Walker.

    Cosgriff's Diary: Friday 14th February 1941 Pro pace [For peace].  Only Horan and Carroll at Mass.  Lecture on Arabic – too hard for me.  Tim and Owen here for lunch.  Visited McCormack and Ronald.  Hours too long at evening meets.  Arthur Amies the only one working.  Horan filling his torch.   Bryant's Diary: Saturday 15th February 1941 Finished the instruction at the 2/15th Bn.   Cosgriff's Diary: Saturday 15th February 1941…

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  • Tobruk Diaries: Doing our jobs...

    Monday 7 February 2011 by Carlie Walker.

    Cosgriff's Diary: Friday 7th February 1941 Fallen soldiers.  Letters from Aileen, Elsa, home (2), Dr Pascal. Tom missed out on mail – sent cable.  Pay day 13 pounds short.  Alex this arvo with Len.  Bath in Errington’s bath-room.  Met Sam Johnston at Windsor Hotel.  Found whereabouts of Owen Steele.  Coffee with Campbell and Honils.  Home at 12:30.    Bryant's Diary: Saturday 8th February 1941 Appointed a Bren instructor …

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  • Tobruk Diaries: The 'Adventure' Begins

    Monday 31 January 2011 by Carlie Walker.

    For the Introduction and Glossary for this blog go to: /education/tobruk_diaries/index.asp   Owen Thomas Cosgriff Owen Thomas Cosgriff was born 21 December 1907 in Korumburra, Victoria.  In his adult years he moved to Brunswick, Victoria, where he lived until his enlistment with the 2/4th Australian General Hospital (A.G.H), AIF, (Australian General Hospital) in Caulfield.  In December 1940, Cosgriff left Melbourne aboard the …

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  • These boots are made for walking... too!

    Wednesday 23 June 2010 by Dianne Rutherford. 1 comments

    Late last year the Memorial received a pair of Second World War escape andevasion (EE)boots as part of a donation. We already held two pairs of 1943 Pattern EE bootsin the collection which were designed so that if an airman baled out or crash landed over enemy territory, he could cut away the suede upper with a concealed knife. This would turn his boots into 'civilian' style shoes to help him evade capture by the Germans. Neitherpair …

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  • Food from Heaven - 460 Squadron and Operation Manna, 1945

    Thursday 29 April 2010 by Dianne Rutherford. 14 comments

    65 years ago a very special operation began to provide food to the starving civilians in the German occupied Netherlands.  During the harsh winter of 1944-1945 the Dutch population endured a major famine. Known as the ‘hungerwinter’ it was concentrated in the densely populated urban areas bounded by Amsterdam, Utrecht, Rotterdam and The Hague. By 1945 the daily ration had been reduced to 600 calories – a third of what it had …

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  • Hospital Ship Centaur

    Friday 5 March 2010 by Dianne Rutherford. 5 comments

    Model of the Hospital Ship Centaur, currently on display in the Second World War gallery. The Memorial holds a small, but important, collection associated with the sinking of the Hospital Ship Centaur, whose wreck site was discovered in December 2009. Many of the survivors had little or no clothing after the ship sank. One, NX33029 Driver George McGrath, was in his underwear, which he lost when he leapt overboard …

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