• A Gallipoli Camera

    Friday 29 June 2012 by Dianne Rutherford. 5 comments

    REL/21582 the camera used by Wilfred Kent-Hughes My name is Isobel White and I am a work experience student from Alfred Deakin High. As part of my week at the War Memorial I have been asked to research an item, an old Kodak camera used in World War 1 by Wilfrid Selwyn Kent Hughes. Wilfred Kent-Hughes B01041 The camera is a Kodak Vest Pocket.  It was originally made around 1912 and it was used by the …

    Read on

  • The Bicycle in Warfare

    Wednesday 23 March 2011 by Ally Roche. 4 comments

    The bicycle is a machine that we can all relate to, it’s a common denominator.  Be that early childhood memories of the first ride down that steep hill, the freedom to go distances that would be problematic on foot or that flat tyre at the most inconvenient time. Today, bike technology has changed dramatically from the bikes that were being used in the First World War.  No carbon fibre frames or dual suspension shock absorbers, gears…

    Read on

  • Seven years bad luck? Making periscopes on Gallipoli

    Friday 15 October 2010 by Dianne Rutherford.

    When the Gallipoli campaign quickly bogged down into trench warfare, there were not enough periscopes available to allow Australian and New Zealand soldiers to look over the parapets at ANZAC without being shot. Australian soldier using an improvised periscope at Gallipoli C01471 Luckily the soldiers do not appear to have been superstitious as to fill the gap improvised periscopes were made by breaking shaving …

    Read on

  • Hospital Ship Centaur

    Friday 5 March 2010 by Dianne Rutherford. 5 comments

    Model of the Hospital Ship Centaur, currently on display in the Second World War gallery. The Memorial holds a small, but important, collection associated with the sinking of the Hospital Ship Centaur, whose wreck site was discovered in December 2009. Many of the survivors had little or no clothing after the ship sank. One, NX33029 Driver George McGrath, was in his underwear, which he lost when he leapt overboard …

    Read on

  • Can't see the tree for the wood... part II : The Baumbeobachter

    Thursday 18 September 2008 by Dianne Rutherford. 8 comments

    An example of an observation post disguised as a tree. This one was used by Australian troops during the Battle of Messines on 7 June 1917 at Hill 63.   Since first blogging about the Memorial's German observation post camouflage tree  (called a "Baumbeobachter" by the Germans, literally meaning "tree observer") I have had a chance to take some photographs of parts of the tree I thought I would share, especially as …

    Read on

  • Can't see the tree for the wood...

    Tuesday 3 June 2008 by Dianne Rutherford. 5 comments

    One of my favourite items at the Memorial is a tall steel and iron German camouflage tree from the First World War. During the First World War fake trees were one method used for disguising observation posts on the Western Front. This tree is from Oosttaverne Wood (also sometimes spelt Oostaverne Wood), near Messines in Belgium. We don't know when the tree was erected in the wood, but it could have been used by the Germans up until 7 …

    Read on

  • The battles of Coral & Balmoral: May-June 1968

    Monday 12 May 2008 by Mal Booth. 1 comments

    Forty years ago, in May/June 1968 Australian soldiers fought their largest, most sustained and arguably most hazardous battles of the Vietnam War. Units of the 1st Australian Task Force (1ATF) confronted regimental-sized formations of the North Vietnamese regular army in fierce actions around Fire Support Patrol Bases (FSPB) Coral and Balmoral in what was then known as Bien Hoa province. The location of FSPBs Coral and Balmoral are …

    Read on

  • Trench Mortar

    Tuesday 1 April 2008 by Dianne Rutherford.

    RELAWM00768

    On display in the Memorial's First World War Gallery is this damaged trench mortar barrel. The explosion thatdamaged this Stokes 3" trench mortar barrel in 1918 also sadly killed two young men from the 6th Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery. Stokes 3" trench mortars were made up of a barrel with a base plate at the bottom and supported by legs that had traversing and elevating gearsto adjust the trajectory.Inside the bottom of the …

    Read on